NIH asked to fight price gouging by overriding drug patents

first_img Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. By Ed Silverman Jan. 11, 2016 Reprints About the Author Reprints Related: A group of 50 congressional lawmakers wants the Obama administration to develop guidelines that would require drug makers to license their patents to others in a bid to end “price gouging.”In their letter, they argue that the National Institutes of Health has the ability to issue so-called march-in rights, which refer to overriding a patent. Under federal law, this allows an agency that funds private research to require a drug maker to license its patent to another party in order to “alleviate health and safety needs which are not being reasonably satisfied” or when the benefits of a drug are not available on “reasonable terms.” Legislators have asked NIH, above, to fight price gouging by creating guidelines that take on drug patents. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Last year, prices for brand-named medicines rose 14.77 percent, and the price tag for specialty drugs increased 9.2 percent. Meanwhile, generic drug prices rose 2.9 percent, according to figures released today by Truveris, a market research firm that tracks pharmaceutical pricing.About three-quarters of Americans believe the prices of brand-name prescription drugs are unreasonable, while 1 in 4 expressed that view about generics, according to a recent poll by STAT and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.advertisement Tags drug pricesNIHpatents In urging the administration to act, the lawmakers argue that “reasonable guidelines can discourage price gouging.” The letter was released on Monday by the Affordable Drug Pricing Task Force, which was formed by several members of Congress last year in response to escalating controversy over the price of prescription medicines. It was also sent to the US Department of Health and Human Services.advertisement The survey was conducted shortly after Turing Pharmaceuticals, which was run by Martin Shkreli, raised the price of a drug used by people with AIDS from $13.50 to $750 a pill. The drug maker raised the price shortly after buying the product from another company, and then took steps to thwart generic competition to the medicine, which is used to treat a life-threatening parasitic infection.In explaining their reasoning, the lawmakers emphasized that march-in rights should only be used when “wrongdoing occurs” and that “innovation should not be threatened.” By issuing guidelines, they argue the NIH would help drug makers make “better-informed pricing decisions.”The lawmakers maintain that as many as one-quarter of the medicines given a priority review by the Food and Drug Administration could be affected. Priority review is granted for drugs that are expected to provide a significant improvement in safety and effectiveness.The lawmakers also take the NIH to task for failing to take this step previously, which sent “an unfortunate signal that that prices for federally funded inventions can be set as high as a sick or dying consumer is willing to pay.”We asked the NIH for comment and will update you accordingly. [email protected] Washington has big hopes, but little power, to negotiate drug prices PharmalotNIH asked to fight price gouging by overriding drug patents @Pharmalot Ed Silvermanlast_img read more

George Church has a wild idea to upend evolution. Here’s your guide

first_img Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. Church has also got a bit of Santa in him, bringing the gift of his imagination — and his name — to so many private companies (as advisor, cofounder, or consultant) that his conflict-of-interest slide is notorious.As for his divinity, not yet. But he has embarked on efforts to resurrect the dead (mammoths, as he explained at a 2013 TedxDeExtinction talk) and smite the living (mosquitoes that carry malaria and other disease-causing pathogens, via a revolutionary technique called gene drive).Something tells me Church lore is voluminous.Indeed. He’s known for subsisting for months on nutrient broth sold to nourish cell lines and for wearing blinders around his lab to remind his students not to succumb to tunnel vision.A bit of an iconoclast, then?More than a bit.When the scientific consensus was moving against engineering the human germline — altering DNA in eggs, sperm, or early embryos so the changes are passed down into successive generations — he told STAT the idea sounded fine to him. After all, he noted, making such genetic tweaks could potentially cure entire families of devastating inherited illnesses, such as Huntington’s, once and for all.When ethicists and lawyers were getting hysterical about genetic privacy, warning that your insurer might drop you or bad actors might blackmail you if they could peek at your genetic blueprint (and thus deduce, for instance, your propensity to develop certain diseases), Church went the other way. In 2005, he launched the Personal Genome Project, inviting volunteers to have their DNA sequenced and then deposited in a public domain for all to see.“Public sharing of genetic data is an explicit goal,” the project’s website explains; the more data, the more the possibility of making important discoveries from it, Church figures.Has he made any important discoveries?Tons.In 1978, as a student at Duke, Church helped determine the three-dimensional structure of transfer RNA, a key genetic molecule. He spent so much time in the lab he failed a course and was expelled from the graduate program; a believer in transparency in all things, Church has posted the “you’re out” letter from the dean.In the 1980s he helped develop DNA sequencing, which made Church think of himself as an engineer as much as a biologist.It also led to some hard feelings. Church was reportedly angry when Eric Lander, a key player in the Human Genome Project of the 1990s, bought different DNA sequencing machines and not the ones Church developed. When Lander came under fire this year for his account of the development of CRISPR, Church was vocal with his own criticism.In 2013, Church raced a former junior scientist in his lab, MIT’s Feng Zhang, to a draw in the competition to make CRISPR work in human and other mammalian cells just months after scientists led by Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, had CRISPR’d DNA floating in test tubes. Zhang had no idea his former mentor was even working on CRISPR, he told STAT.In between tRNA and CRISPR, Church coauthored hundreds of scientific papers, from “Predicting regulons and their cis-regulatory motifs by comparative genomics” to “Characterization of Cas9-guide RNA orthologs.”What made him want to be a scientist?The 1965 World’s Fair in New York City, according to a recent interview he gave the Harvard Gazette. He saw the future (animatronic robots, touch-screen computers), noticed it hadn’t arrived yet, and decided, “if I want that, I have to work for it.”The Unisphere was built in Queens for the 1964-1965 World’s Fair as a symbol of world peace. Frank Franklin II/APCan he create that future by remaining in academia?Not solely.Church has cofounded about one company per year since 2005 and plans to add nine to that in 2016, each with one of his entrepreneurial postdoctoral fellows.As he told the Gazette: “It’s not sufficient to just write out a patent and lob it over the fence. You have to accompany it. … Probably 10 percent of my time is spent making sure that the technologies that I work on get a fair shake in the marketplace.”Why would he want to create entire genomes from scratch?Church has been circumspect about this because he has submitted what is reported to be a blockbuster paper on genomes-from-scratch, also known as “de novo synthesis,” to the journal Science. But he has talked about how building a de novo genome (which would require creating about 3 billion chemical letters) might, eventually, be easier than using CRISPR to edit, say, a big-muscle gene, or an HIV-AIDS-resistance gene.At a recent genomic hackathon in Cambridge, Mass., he said that “someday we’ll build genomes that are resistant to cancer.”That (plus the CRISPR’d pigs) must be enough futuristic projects for him.Not a chance. Church is only warming up.He has never lost his love for his decades-ago work on DNA sequencing, and thinks we’re this close to developing cheap handheld sequencers. Then, when some idiot sneezes all over you, you can whip out your sequencer, catch droplets, and get a readout of whether they contain cold viruses that you’re resistant to (phew), viruses you’re susceptible to (wash hands and face right now), or a pathogen that can kill you.“My prediction is we’ll have real-time sequence-based identification” of ambient germs, Church told the hackathon.I’m not afraid of germs. What’s he got for me?About 48 potential gene therapies are “in the pipeline in our lab” to reverse aging. Church hasn’t said if he’d like to be a guinea pig, but if he is, just wait and see what happens to the Darwin/Santa/God beard. About the Author Reprints Harvard biologist George Church burst into the headlines (yet again) last week when he helped organize a closed-door meeting of scores of top scientists to discuss accelerating efforts to create synthetic DNA — including a complete human genome. They’re considering launching a decade-long drive to build, from scratch, all the genes that make humans human.The meeting raised all sorts of ethical questions. But that’s nothing new for Church. He has been stirring controversy, and excitement, in the scientific community for decades. He wants to reanimate the woolly mammoth, edit pig genes so their organs can be transplanted safely into people — oh, and reverse aging.In short, you’ll want to keep an eye on him. Here’s a start:advertisement By Sharon Begley May 16, 2016 Reprints Sharon Begley HeavyweightsGeorge Church has a wild idea to upend evolution. Here’s your guide center_img George Church has been stirring controversy, and excitement, in the scientific community for decades. Susan Walsh/AP [email protected] Who is George Church?He’s the Harvard biologist who has become as famous for his Stephen Colbert appearances and for looking like Charles Darwin, Santa Claus, or God (depending on your bent) as for his many seminal scientific discoveries.So, who is he most like, Darwin or … ?Darwin explained how species evolve. Church wants to turbocharge that process by putting new genes into organisms rather than waiting around for them to evolve those genes on their own. For instance, he is using CRISPR, the revolutionary genome-editing technology he helped develop, to alter 62 pig genes at a time, which might allow their organs to be transplanted into people without being rejected.advertisement @sxbegle Tags CRISPRgene editinggeneticslast_img read more

Twirling ballerinas, an acrobat, and love potion: inside a party on the first night of JPM

first_img Tags financepharmaceuticalsSTAT+ Log In | Learn More GET STARTED Alex Hogan/STAT Twirling ballerinas, an acrobat, and love potion: inside a party on the first night of JPM Unlock this article — plus daily market-moving biopharma analysis — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED What is it? What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. By Rebecca Robbins Jan. 10, 2017 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. SAN FRANCISCO — On a night when pricey booze flowed at drug industry-sponsored parties all over this city, the bar was high for the most lavish bash of the evening. But the party thrown Monday night by Johnson & Johnson’s innovation unit cleared it. Easily.Held under dramatic colored lighting in the stately and cathedral-esque Asian Art Museum, the Johnson & Johnson JLABS bash drew hundreds of executives and investors in town for the industry’s annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference. Business last_img read more

Italy’s Emma Morano, the world’s oldest person, dies at 117

first_img ROME — Emma Morano, at 117 the world’s oldest person who is also believed to have been the last surviving person born in the 1800s, died Saturday at her home in northern Italy, her physician said.Dr. Carlo Bava told The Associated Press by phone that Morano’s caretaker had called him to say she had stopped breathing in the afternoon while sitting in an armchair at her home in Verbania, a town on Italy’s Lake Maggiore.Bava said he had last seen his patient on Friday when “she thanked me and held my hand,” as she did every time he called on her. While Morano had been increasingly spending more time sleeping and less time speaking in recent weeks, she had still eaten her daily raw egg and biscuits that day, he said.advertisement Associated Press Tags nutritionpatients By Associated Press April 15, 2017 Reprints Emma Morano sits in her apartment in Verbania, Italy, in 2015. Antonio Calanni/Associated Press Morano, born on Nov. 29, 1899, had been living in a tidy, one-room apartment, where she was kept company by her caregiver and two elderly nieces.“She didn’t suffer. I’m happy she didn’t suffer but passed away that way, tranquilly,” Bava said Saturday.He said she had been her usual chatterbox self until a few weeks ago. Since then it was clear, “she was slowly fading away,” and spending nearly all day in bed, Bava said.Last fall on her birthday, Morano declared: “I’m happy I have turned 117!”Morano left her husband in 1938 because he would beat her. She “abandoned the husband in the Fascist era, when women were supposed to be very submissive,” Bava said in a 2015 interview. “She was always very decisive.”Morano began working in a factory making jute bags when she was 16. Then she worked at a hotel, working way beyond the usual retirement age.Beside work, she enjoyed herself. She was considered a good dancer with a beautiful singing voice in her youth.She also defied health advice, Bava said Saturday. Some doctors had warned her against eating three eggs daily, which she did for years, but she ignored their advice.Researchers from Harvard Medical School visited her in 2014 as part of a study into immunity to diseases, the Italian news agency ANSA said. About the Author Reprints HealthItaly’s Emma Morano, the world’s oldest person, dies at 117 A woman in Jamaica, Violet Brown, who was born in that Caribbean island on March 10, 1900, is now considered the oldest known person in the world, according to a list kept by the Gerontology Research Group. Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness tweeted his congratulations to her.Morano’s doctor, who lives a few blocks away from his patient, had been her physician for nearly a quarter of a century.advertisementlast_img read more

Relaxing patient privacy rules would worsen the opioid epidemic

first_img Tags addictionadvocacyopioids As the national opioid epidemic continues to escalate, policymakers are increasingly desperate for solutions to stem the tide of devastation. Those of us who have been working to fight for decades to combat addiction in America — through the crack epidemic, the meth epidemic, and the previous heroin epidemic — have a message for them: Listen to the voices of patients, families, and recovery advocates to understand what to do and how to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past or creating more damage.We also have a message for patients, families, and recovery advocates: Make your voices heard now as Congress considers the Overdose Prevention and Patient Safety Act. This legislation would jeopardize the confidentiality of substance use treatment and discourage patients from seeking the care they need to get well and stay well — and stay alive.At issue is a section of the Code of Federal Regulations known as 42 CFR Part 2 (or just “Part 2” for short). It was established more than 40 years ago in the middle of the nation’s previous opioid epidemic, when policymakers realized that people were not seeking treatment because they were afraid that doing so could lead to their being arrested, losing custody of their children, or other negative consequences.advertisement Paul N. Samuels Patty McCarthy Metcalf Related: That is why more than 100 organizations representing millions of people in recovery from addiction have joined forces to oppose weakening the core protections provided under 42 CFR Part 2. Such a change would have the chilling effect of discouraging patients with substance use disorders from seeking the care they need to get well and stay well.Unfortunately, Part 2 has become a convenient scapegoat for miscommunication or poor treatment of patients with substance use disorders in general medical settings. One reason for this is the widespread lack of understanding about when and where Part 2’s protections apply. There is a misperception that these rules contribute to the opioid crisis by preventing the sharing of health information in medical settings. That is inaccurate. Part 2 applies only to health care facilities and clinicians whose primary purpose is to provide substance use disorder care. It doesn’t apply in emergency departments, surgical units, primary care offices, and the like. In those settings, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, the standard patient privacy law, applies. @lac_news Taylor Wilson’s parents fought for 41 days to get their daughter treatment. They couldn’t stop another overdose Part 2 created an added layer of confidentiality protection for individuals receiving treatment in addiction-specific programs, such as residential addiction treatment programs, methadone clinics, and detoxification units within hospitals. Treatment programs covered by Part 2 are, for example, prohibited from giving a patient’s medical records without a special court order to law enforcement or to people suing the patient. These programs also cannot share patient information with payers or other providers without the patient’s written consent. Unlike other diseases, drug addiction is criminalized in our society. It is not just stigma that keeps people in recovery from being open about their history of alcohol and/or drug addiction. It is the very real risk that disclosure could result in loss of employment, loss of housing, loss of child custody, loss of benefits, discrimination by medical professionals, and even arrest, prosecution, and incarceration. Part 2 is often the only shield between individuals in recovery and the many forms of discrimination and prejudice that could destroy their lives.advertisement Please enter a valid email address. Firefighters transport an overdose victim to a hospital in Rockford, Ill. Scott Olson/Getty Imagescenter_img Newsletters Sign up for First Opinion A weekly digest of our opinion column, with insight from industry experts. Leave this field empty if you’re human: In the midst of this devastating national opioid epidemic, we cannot afford to have patients and their families fear seeking treatment because they don’t have faith that their confidentiality will be protected. Instead of improving care, the proposed changes to 42 CFR Part 2 could discourage patients from seeking treatment while also exposing them to potential discrimination and harm, as well as magnifying their vulnerability to data breaches, an increasingly common occurrence in today’s connected world.When it comes to health care policy, decision-makers should follow the standard “First, do no harm” rule. Loosening privacy protections for people in treatment for a substance use disorder or in recovery from one would undermine efforts to solve the nation’s opioid crisis. And the harm stemming from it would be immeasurable and immediate.Paul N. Samuels is the president and director of the Legal Action Center, a national nonprofit legal and advocacy organization that works to protect the rights of people with addiction. Patty McCarthy Metcalf is executive director of Faces & Voices of Recovery, the nation’s leading recovery advocacy organization. Privacy Policy First OpinionRelaxing patient privacy rules would worsen the opioid epidemic About the Authors Reprints A scrappy upstart in the pain pill business takes on mighty Purdue Pharma By Paul N. Samuels and Patty McCarthy Metcalf Nov. 24, 2017 Reprints Related: @FACESandVOICES So when a patient comes to an emergency department after having overdosed on heroin or another opioid, Part 2 does not stand in the way of doctors contacting the family. When a patient comes in for surgery and the doctor does not ask about or document the patient’s history of substance use, Part 2 is not the problem. HIPAA is already the law of the land in these scenarios, and relaxing Part 2 will not improve communication or patient care.What relaxing or dismantling Part 2 will do is make the records of patients and their families engaged in addiction treatment more vulnerable to being misused in ways that harm the patient. It means that patients in recovery from opioid addiction who are taking medications such as methadone, buprenorphine, or injectable naltrexone would lose the added protection that Part 2 currently provides. It means that family members who are participating in a loved one’s treatment risk having details of family therapy shared without their consent.last_img read more

Shutdown would suspend CDC flu program during severe influenza season

first_img About the Authors Reprints Senior News Editor [email protected] Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Update: Officials said Friday night that flu response would be preserved. Read more here. WASHINGTON — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention won’t be able to support its annual influenza program if the government shuts down at midnight, according to the contingency plan for federal health agencies posted Friday. This year’s timing coincides with an especially severe flu season that has not yet reached its peak.The most recent shutdown, in 2013, saw the majority of CDC flu staff furloughed, MedPage Today reported. “State health departments [were] still collecting flu data, but their information [was] not being sent to the CDC. Among other things, that means the agency has no idea of the geographic spread of the disease — something that’s often used to smooth out the delivery of vaccine.” Politics What is it? Unlock this article — plus daily intelligence on Capitol Hill and the life sciences industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTEDcenter_img Erin Mershon What’s included? Log In | Learn More By Erin Mershon and Ike Swetlitz Jan. 19, 2018 Reprints A flu shot is drawn. Tim Boyle/Getty Images Shutdown would suspend CDC flu program during severe influenza season Tags infectious diseasepolicy @eemershon last_img read more

Pharmalittle: Glaxo considers shedding its consumer unit; Amazon is eyeing a large pharmacy chain in India

first_imgPharmalot Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED By Ed Silverman July 23, 2018 Reprints Tags financelegalpharmaceuticalspharmalittleSTAT+ Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Alex Hogan/STAT STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Good morning, everyone, and welcome to another working week. We hope the weekend respite was relaxing and refreshing, because that oh-so-familiar routine of meetings, deadlines, and what-not has, of course, returned. This may be summertime, but the world does keep spinning, yes? So while you start to cope with this notion and the laundry lists of things to do, here are a few items of interest to help you along. We hope you have a smashing day and, as always, encourage you to keep in touch. A reminder: we accept all forms of secret communications and plans …GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) is considering breaking up its businesses, according to The Financial Times. Glaxo chairman Philip Hampton has held talks with some of the shareholders about creating a standalone pharmaceuticals and vaccines company in the medium term, although the dispensing with the consumer unit might not happen for two or three years. The company is expected to outline its new approach for the division in the coming week when it reports second-quarter results on Wednesday.center_img Ed Silverman [email protected] What’s included? Log In | Learn More Pharmalittle: Glaxo considers shedding its consumer unit; Amazon is eyeing a large pharmacy chain in India GET STARTED @Pharmalot What is it?last_img read more

What disclosure? Half of European clinical trials are not being reported

first_img Ed Silverman Adobe Pharmalot What is it? About the Author Reprints GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. [email protected] @Pharmalot center_img By Ed Silverman Sept. 12, 2018 Reprints Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED What’s included? Log In | Learn More Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. What disclosure? Half of European clinical trials are not being reported Four years after clinical trial sponsors were told to report summary results in the European Union, half of the registered studies remain unreported, although drug makers are doing a much better job at disclosure than other organizations, a new analysis finds.Specifically, only 51 percent of more than 7,600 clinical trial results have so far been reported since the European Commission issued guidelines in 2014. However, 68 percent of trials sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry have reported results, while only 11 percent of trials sponsored by hospitals, academics, governments, and charities have done so, according to the analysis published in BMJ. Tags drug developmentpharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

Pharmalittle: Merck’s Keytruda fails breast cancer trial; a pair of Sacklers flee New York

first_imgPharmalot Pharmalittle: Merck’s Keytruda fails breast cancer trial; a pair of Sacklers flee New York About the Author Reprints GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. @Pharmalot What is it? Ed Silvermancenter_img Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED By Ed Silverman May 21, 2019 Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Log In | Learn More [email protected] Top of the morning to you and a fine one it is. A delicious breeze and shiny warm sun are enveloping the Pharmalot campus, where the short people have left for their productive destinations and our official mascot is happily snoozing under our feet. This means we are free to brew cups of stimulation and, most important, forage for interesting tidbits. Speaking of which, here are a few items of interest to help you on your own journey. Hope all goes well and feel free to send along hints and allegations. We enjoy a mysterious hunt. …Former Manhattan society staples David and Joss Sackler are fleeing town and heading to Florida in a bid to escape the imperishable stain of their scandal-soaked family’s OxyContin business, The New York Post dishes. David — whose family’s company, Purdue Pharma, is accused of igniting the opioid crisis by aggressively marketing the painkiller, then directing efforts to mislead the public about its addictive risks — and wife Joss lived it up in a $6.5 million Upper East Side apartment. The couple were mainstays on the New York social scene, as well as big art patrons and donors to major museums. Tags drug pricingfinancelegalMedicareopioidspharmaceuticalsSTAT+Supreme Court Alex Hogan/STATlast_img read more

Pharmalittle: Grassley presses Novartis over data manipulation; top Trump drug policy adviser is leaving

first_img About the Author Reprints Pharmalittle: Grassley presses Novartis over data manipulation; top Trump drug policy adviser is leaving Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED By Ed Silverman Aug. 13, 2019 Reprints What is it? Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Ed Silverman Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Log In | Learn More Rise and shine, everyone, another busy day is on the way. Yes, it may be holiday time for many, but the world continues to spin for the rest of us. So fire up your coffee kettles and prepare for another round of meetings, deadlines, text messages, conference calls, encrypted chatter, and whatever else helps you move down the assembly line. Meanwhile, please enjoy the items of interest we have gathered. Hope your day is smashing and, as always, do keep in touch. We appreciate the missives, tips and suggestions. …A historic clinical trial has shown that two therapies made from Ebola antibodies appear to be improving survival rates among people who receive them, STAT reports. The announcement marks the first time a clinical trial has successfully shown that an Ebola therapy improves survival in people who have been infected. Only limited and preliminary data are available at this point, but the therapies showed mortality rates ranging from 29% to 53%.center_img What’s included? [email protected] Pharmalot STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Alex Hogan/STAT GET STARTED @Pharmalot Tags Donald Trumpdrug pricinggovernment agenciesinfectious diseasepharmaceuticalspharmalittleSTAT+last_img read more