Neymar plays down injury fears ahead of clash with Liverpool

first_imgNeymar believes the injury he sustained in Brazil’s 1-0 win over Cameroon was “nothing serious”.The Paris St Germain forward came off in the early stages of Tuesday’s friendly in Milton Keynes due to a groin problem.After the game, Brazil boss Tite would not discuss the injury. Brazil said Neymar would be assessed by PSG, who host Liverpool in the Champions League next Wednesday.The player himself said in a message posted on Instagram: “Thanks to everyone who sent me messages wishing a good recovery, I think it was nothing serious.”Brazil team doctor Rodrigo Lasmar also suggested the issue was not a major one.Lasmar was quoted by SporTV as saying: “He (Neymar) has been evaluated, has already initiated the treatment. (He) will need a little more time for a better evaluation, an image exam, but at first it is nothing important.”After Neymar came off in the eighth minute at Stadium MK, his replacement, Everton’s Richarlison, scored just before half-time.Tuesday also saw Neymar’s PSG team-mate Kylian Mbappe sustain a shoulder injury. He was forced off in France’s 1-0 win over Uruguay after an awkward landing.last_img read more

Apoel back on top after winning top of the table showdown

first_imgApoel were the big winners of the weekend’s top of the table clash against Apollon and moved above the Limassol side at the top of the table as the championship now enters the crucial playoff stage.Omonia made sure of their place in the top six with a convincing 2-0 over AEL, overtaking Nea Salamina in the process, who could only draw at home to Alki.In a tense and fiercely contested game at the Tsirion stadium Apoel came back from a goal down, to defeat their big championship rivals Apollon 2-1.The champions just about deserved their win in a game where chances were few and far between with both sets of players more intent on keeping a clean sheet than scoring at the other end. In the opening 45 minutes Apoel managed just one good goal-scoring opportunity to Apollon’s none, while in the second half, each side had a chance each, both in added time with Papoulis and Zahid being denied by the respective goalkeepers.This was the third consecutive match that Apollon has lost to Apoel, and this despite taking the lead in this tight game just after the hour mark through their top scorer Facundo Pereira. However Apollon hung onto their lead for just three minutes, something that their coach Sofronis Avgousti said was pivotal in the final outcome.It was a soft goal to concede as Natel’s strike from the edge of the box caught Apollon goalkeeper Bruno Vale both unsighted and wrong-footed.However it was apparent over the 90 minutes that Apollon sorely missed the Croatian Anton Maglica who left Apollon for China earlier this month to continue his career at Guizhou Hengfeng. His departure may tip the scales in favour of  rivals Apoel and AEL especially as the transfer period ended on the last day of January.Apoel seem to have found a new hero in their tall gangling striker Norbert Balogh. For the second consecutive game the Hungarian proved his worth, this time latching on to Zahid’s through ball to beat Apollon goalkeeper Bruno Vale from the edge of the penalty box six minutes from the end. Balogh could have doubled his tally in added time when clean through, but he unselfishly squared to Zahid who somehow managed to make a hash of it and the chance went begging.Anorthosis finished the regular season with a 3-2 away win to Ermis Aradipou but it all proved pointless as they finished outside the top six.Cleary disillusioned and saddened with all the off-field events going on at Anorthosis, their coach Jurgen Streppel made his feelings known when he took his entire team to the post-game press conference and accused the club of leaving the players unpaid for 2-3 months and without even a club doctor.Andreas Panteli resigned over the weekend as the club’s president.Omonia overcame a lacklustre AEL at the GSP stadium with their Costa Rican striker David Ramírez grabbing both goals, one in each half.AEK needed 53 minutes and a rather soft penalty to break the deadlock against relegation threatened Enosis Neon Paralimni at the Arena stadium.Eventually AEK ran out 3-0 winners with Larena, Akino and Triscovski getting onto the scoresheet.Alki managed a draw against Nea Salamina and the point may prove precious as they battle to avoid relegation. Both goals were scored in the first half with Alki taking the lead through Carlos in the 17th minute and Fustar equalising on the half hour.In the final weekend game Pafos FC moved well clear of the relegation zone as they overcame Doxa Katokopias 1-0 thanks to a 55th minute Angulo goal.last_img read more

Lucas hat-trick helps Spurs to thrash Huddersfield

first_imgTottenham Hotspur’s Brazil forward Lucas Moura struck a superb hat-trick in a 4-0 win over relegated Huddersfield Town on Saturday to bolster the home side’s hopes of a top-four finish in the Premier League.Spurs were without the injured Harry Kane and Dele Alli but Lucas’s treble after an early Victor Wanyama goal were just reward for a dominant display against the bottom side.The win in the early game took Spurs up to third place, a point ahead of Chelsea and four points clear of fifth-placed fellow London rivals Arsenal, who have a game in hand.Tottenham made seven changes from the side that beat Manchester City 1-0 at home in the Champions League in midweek, with an eye on the quarter-final second leg on Wednesday.Wanyama put Spurs ahead after 24 minutes with a fine individual goal after dribbling around goalkeeper Ben Hamer and tucking the ball into an empty net from a Ben Davies pass.Three minutes later the hosts scored again thanks to a fierce right-foot drive by Lucas that flew underneath Hamer after the excellent Moussa Sissoko set him up on the break.Spurs’ Fernando Llorente hit the bar after halftime and Huddersfield’s Juninho Bacuna had a late free kick tipped on to the bar before Christian Eriksen hit the post on the counter.Six minutes later Lucas controlled Eriksen’s cross and fired into the bottom corner past the helpless Hamer before rounding off the win by smashing into the top corner in stoppage time.last_img read more

La Liga training to resume this week with season restart in June

first_imgSpanish football began the path back towards normality on Monday as organisers said clubs would resume training this week for the first time since activity was halted due to the coronavirus pandemic and targeted resuming the season in June.Organising body La Liga said clubs in the top two divisions would return to individual training following a protocol it had agreed with Spain’s sports and health authorities and which guaranteed the safety of players and staff.The protocol obliges players to undergo testing for the novel coronavirus before they can return to training facilities.“These measures cover a period of approximately four weeks with different phases that, in any case, will be subject to the de-escalation process established by the government,” said the statement.“Thus, together with the medical tests carried out by clubs, a staggered return to training has been implemented that will start with players training alone and with group activities prior to the return to competition, scheduled for June.”La Liga president Javier Tebas said the season would bring back a sense of normality to Spain, which has lost over 25,000 lives to the virus and seen its economy paralysed.“This crisis has had a profound impact on all of us. The return of football is a sign that society is progressing towards the new normal. It will also bring back an element of life that people in Spain and around the world know and love,” he said.“People’s health is paramount so we have a comprehensive protocol to safeguard the health of everyone involved as we work to restart La Liga. Circumstances are unprecedented but we hope to start playing again in June and finish our season this summer.”While France’s Ligue 1 was declared finished last week and the Dutch top-flight was also ended, the major stakeholders in Spain have remained determined to complete the season in order to avoid potential losses of around one billion euros.Tebas has been particularly bullish about restarting the campaign and criticised the cancellation of the French season, which was the first of Europe’s five major leagues to fall victim to the crisis.Spanish football federation chief Luis Rubiales, who has had some high-profile clashes with Tebas in the past, has also remained committed to getting the season back on the road, as has Spain’s minister for sport Irene Lozano.last_img read more

Eduard Folayang is ONE Championship Fighter of the Year

first_imgHardaway powers Hawks to long-awaited OT win over Spurs The 32-year-old Folayang topped women’s champion Angela Lee, featherweight king Marat Gafurov, bantamweight titleholder Bibano Fernandes and Ev Ting for the recognition.A fast-rising star, the 20-year-old Lee won the atomweight title after outlasting Mei Yamaguchi last May. Lee totes a perfect 6-0 record.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town PH among economies most vulnerable to virus EDITORS’ PICK We are young Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Senators to proceed with review of VFA READ: Worth the wait: Folayang cops ONE lightweight title, stops AokiThe three-time SEA Games gold medalist in Wushu went 3-0 last year, scoring unanimous decision victories over Tetsuya Yamada and Adrian Pang before a second-round stoppage of Aoki.AdChoices广告Ads by TeadsFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliSPORTSWe are youngIt was a bounce back year for Folayang, who, prior to his unbeaten streak, suffered a brutal knockout loss to Timofey Nastyukhin in December 2014.READ: Written off at first, Folayang pens own story with ONE title win Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Eduard Folayang: Discipline leads to longevity PLAY LIST 02:58Eduard Folayang: Discipline leads to longevity01:44One Championship Fire & Fury Open workout02:17Eduard Folayang hopes to leave lasting legacy01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH MOST READ Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Photo from ONE ChampionshipFilipino MMA champion Eduard “Landslide” Folayang was named ONE Championship’s Fighter of the Year just a month after celebrating his first world title.Folayang won the ONE lightweight belt, stopping Japanese legend Shinya Aoki in spectacular fashion in Singapore that capped the Baguio City native’s undefeated campaign in 2016.ADVERTISEMENT Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town View commentslast_img read more

8 species of birds have possibly gone extinct over past few decades

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forests, Green, Research, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta A new study has found that eight species of birds are likely to have completely disappeared in the past couple of decades.Researchers recommend that three species currently listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List be reclassified as extinct, while one be treated as extinct in the wild.Four more bird species are dangerously close to extinction, if not already there, and should be re-classified as critically endangered (possibly extinct), researchers say. Eight species of birds may have completely disappeared over the past couple of decades, a new study has found. Among these is the Spix’s macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii), a bird that inspired the character of Blu in the 2011 animated film Rio. Found only in Brazil, the bird has not seen in the wild since 2000.Like the Spix’s macaw, several other bird species are believed to have become extinct in recent years. To pinpoint the ones that may already be gone, researchers from BirdLife International, a global partnership of conservation organizations focusing on bird conservation, looked at 51 species of birds with a “reasonable possibility of being extinct.” These are species that have either not been seen in the wild for more than 10 years despite exhaustive surveys, or species that have been seen within the last 10 years, but whose tiny population has suffered well-documented decline.Stuart Butchart, BirdLife’s chief scientist, and his colleagues used a new statistical approach to arrive at the probability of extinction for the 51 species by combining information on the intensity of threats to the bird species, timing and reliability of records for the species, as well as timing and quality of efforts made to survey the species.Based on their results, the researchers recommend that three species currently listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List be reclassified as extinct. These include the cryptic treehunter (Cichlocolaptes mazarbarnetti), last seen in the wild in 2007; the Alagoas foliage-gleaner (Philydor novaesi), not seen in the wild since 2011; and the poʻo-uli (Melamprosops phaeosoma), not seen since 2004. The Spix’s macaw, which has some individuals surviving in captivity, should be reclassified as extinct in the wild, the researchers say in the study published in Biological Conservation.A poʻo-uli, or black-faced honeycreeper. Image © ciro_albano.Four more bird species are dangerously close to extinction, if not already there, the team found. These species — the New Caledonian lorikeet (Charmosyna diadema), the Javan lapwing (Vanellus macropterus), the Pernambuco pygmy owl (Glaucidium mooreorum) and the glaucous macaw (Anodorhynchus glaucus) — should be treated as critically endangered (possibly extinct), the researchers say. The “possibly extinct” tag applies to a subset of critically endangered species that are, based on available evidence, likely to be extinct. However, there could be local reports of the species that need verification, or there could be a small chance that future surveys might confirm the species’ presence.While most bird extinctions have previously occurred on islands, the rate of extinctions on continents is now increasing, the study found, driven mainly by deforestation and habitat loss, invasive species, and hunting and trapping. Five of the eight confirmed or suspected extinctions took place in South America. Of these, four occurred in Brazil, demonstrating how rampant deforestation is driving species extinctions, the researchers say.“Ninety per cent of bird extinctions in recent centuries have been of species on islands,” Butchart said in a statement. “However, our results confirm that there is a growing wave of extinctions sweeping across the continents, driven mainly by habitat loss and degradation from unsustainable agriculture and logging.”A Spix’s Macaw. Image © Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation.Citation:Butchart, S. H., Lowe, S., Martin, R. W., Symes, A., Westrip, J. R., & Wheatley, H. (2018). Which bird species have gone extinct? A novel quantitative classification approach. Biological Conservation, 227, 9-18.*Correction (09/09/2018): The photograph of poʻo-uli in the story originally mis-identified the bird as an Alagoas foliage-gleaner. We have corrected the caption. We thank our readers for pointing out the error.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Stay or go? Understanding a partial seasonal elephant migration

first_imgdata, Elephants, GPS tracking, Mammals, Migration, Monitoring, Research, Savannas, Tagging, Technology, Tracking, Water Scarcity, Wildlife, Wildtech Elephants in Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park wearing GPS tracking tags shared a general dry-season home range but followed three different wet-season migration strategies: residency, short-distance migration, and long-distance migration.Despite similar dry-season conditions that kept all the tagged elephants near provisioned waterholes, the migrating elephants began their seasonal movements at the onset of the first rains.Scientists urge collaboration among stakeholders and countries to maintain the long-distance, cross-border migrations some animals need to survive. African elephants use areas of grassland, bushland, and woodland, but how do they move through these different vegetation types in different seasons, especially where water becomes a seasonally scarce resource?Elephants drink roughly 200 liters (50 gallons) of water each day. In Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park, they come together at waterholes such as this one during the region’s dry season (August through October). Image by Sue Palminteri/Mongabay.Researchers in Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe have been monitoring the movements of 32 female elephants over the last several years to find out. Some, but not all, of the elephants migrated seasonally, up to 250 kilometers (155 miles) from their tagging site. Using GPS/VHF radio tracking tags, the researchers are studying the variability in and potential drivers of the elephants’ movements over time, including these seasonal migrations.Arnold Tshipa, the Zambezi region environmental officer for Wilderness Safaris, leads the field work. Tshipa is also writing his master’s thesis at Zimbabwe’s National University of Science and Technology on the migration of Hwange’s elephants with technical guidance from France’s National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and support from both institutions.Arnold Tshipa fitting a tracking tag and collar on one of the 32 female elephants spending dry seasons in northeastern Hwange National Park. Image courtesy of Arnold Tshipa.Tshipa and his fellow researchers tagged the elephants in the northeastern section of Hwange to better understand how female elephant move around and use different habitats in and around the park, as well as their population dynamics, given Hwange’s high density of elephants. Census data suggest that 45,000 elephants live inside Hwange National Park, more than half of the more than 82,000 elephants estimated for Zimbabwe as a whole, leading to an estimated density of three elephants per square kilometer (5 per square mile).Tshipa and colleagues suggest in their 2017 publication that the Hwange elephants are part of the world’s largest elephant metapopulation, which stretches across five southern African countries in the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA). The researchers used daily location readings from the tracking tags to chart the seasonal movements that separate the subpopulations geographically and reconnect them during the wet season.The Hwange elephant movement project team fitting a sedated elephant with a tracking tag and collar. Jobs include monitoring the sedation, fitting the collar, checking the tag, measuring the elephant’s size, assessing its health, age, and sex, and documenting through notes and photographs. Image courtesy of Arnold Tshipa.Previous research has confirmed wide-ranging, cross-boundary movements of elephants across areas of natural vegetation in the KAZA region, highlighting the need for cross-border movement corridors and coordinated planning and policies. The movement data gained from wildlife tracking tags can improve the effectiveness of broad-scale conservation efforts by assessing current reserve boundaries, designing linkages between reserves, identifying stakeholders whose management influences tagged animals, and helping various stakeholders coordinate management efforts across the animals’ areas of movement.A partial migrationTshipa and his colleagues have focused their analyses on the elephants’ use of space during two key periods: the late wet season in February and March, and the late dry season in September and October. They have categorized elephant movement behavior according to the distance between each animal’s respective wet- and dry-season ranges. Longer-distance migrations are those with greater distance and less overlap between the wet- and dry-season ranges.Dry-season and wet-season ranges of elephants tagged in Hwange National Park. Each individual’s movements are represented by a different color. The area in grey is within the boundary of the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area. Limits of Hwange (in Zimbabwe) and Chobe, Nxai and Makgadikgadi Pans National Parks (in Botswana) are shown. Image from Tshipa et al (2018). “Partial migration links local surface-water management to large-scale elephant conservation in the world’s largest transfrontier conservation area.” Biological Conservation.Tshipa said the team classified 10 of the 32 tagged elephants as “resident” elephants. For these elephants, the center points of the dry-season and wet-season ranges were less than 50 kilometers (31 miles) apart, and there was more than 50 percent overlap between the two range areas.For the rest of the tagged elephants, deemed “migratory,” there was less than 50 percent overlap between their dry- and wet-season ranges. The distance between the center points of these two seasonal range areas distinguished the short-distance migrants from the longer-distance migrants. Range centers of the 12 short-distance migrants were less than 50 kilometers apart, while those of the remaining 10 long-distance migrants were farther apart, up to 160 kilometers (99 miles).Eight elephants migrated into Botswana, as far as the Nxai Pan, some 260 kilometers (161 miles) from their tagging area. This normally dry salt pan becomes grassy in the wet season, attracting elephants and thousands of other large herbivores, including zebra and wildebeest.Baobab trees at Nxai Pan National Park, the destination of Hwange’s farthest-moving tagged elephants. Image by Ana Isabel Alia, Wikimedia Commons, CC 4.0.Rainfall decreases as one travels west from Zimbabwe to Botswana, so the elephants that migrate do so at the onset of the wet season. “It starts as soon as we have the first few rains,” Tshipa said. “Once they see those first few rains, they start moving.”Nevertheless, Tshipa added, “there’s a lot of variability in distance and time spent. Some spend a long time in Botswana, while others go just for two days. We still don’t know how much of the population actually does this; 22 percent of the tagged elephants do, but how much of the population do we have?”The eight tagged Hwange elephants that migrated to Botswana stayed longer in private wildlife management areas than in formal protected areas, confirming the importance of the private sector in elephant conservation. Their movements also support the establishment of region-wide elephant management policies to address, for example, how institutions should respond to any changes in water supply in Hwange National Park, through human action or more severe droughts, that could dramatically affect elephants’ distribution in this region.What drives elephants to move?The Hwange researchers are particularly interested in the transboundary movements the elephants repeated over several years and what might be driving them.A map comparing the three types of movement patterns of the 32 GPS-tagged elephants in Hwange NP. All used similar dry-season resources, yet some (“residents”) remained in their tagging area all year while others migrated southwest, up to 260 km (155 miles) from the tagging area, into Botswana. They stayed for some or all of the wet season and returned to Hwange the following dry season. Image by Arnold Tshipa.Humans have altered much of the arid region’s landscape, including provisioning water for wildlife within national parks and game reserves during the dry season, which Tshipa says is driving migrations. Unlike their wide ranging during wet season, both resident and migratory tagged elephants returned to and were faithful to their smaller dry-season ranges.In the dry season, the researchers state in their paper, elephant breeding herds forage within 15 kilometers (9 miles) of water. The dry-season ranges of the tagged elephants all include permanent waterholes. Hwange National Park lacks a permanent river, and during the dry season water is available primarily at the waterholes.A natural migration may have occurred before the provisioning of water, Tshipa said, comprised of elephants migrating further north to the Gway River. “That might have been a migration route,” he said, “but now because there’s water holes dotted all over the place, there’s no need for [them] to proceed to the river.”Spending quality time at the local watering hole is a daily necessity for elephants. This herd is drinking at one of Hwange National Park’s human-provisioned waterholes. Image by Sue Palminteri/Mongabay.Moreover, hunting occurs at the river but not at the protected waterholes, making them more attractive areas for elephants. “Most of the collared elephants are not crossing into that hunting area, and if they do, it’s a very quick cross into and back out,” Tshipa said.The ranges of the elephants during the wet season, when food and water are more widely accessible, are all larger than their respective dry-season ranges. Having determined that water supplies drive migration patterns, the Hwange researchers are studying whether other factors, such as habitat structure, demography, or competition, play a key role.“It’s always difficult to separate water from vegetation,” Tshipa said, “because one is linked to the other. So we’re asking how do distance to water and habitat structure influence the migration route.”Availability of both water and vegetation drive broad-scale movements of elephants and other partially migratory species, such as zebras. Image by Sue Palminteri/Mongabay.The researchers have categorized the cross-border study zone into open grasslands, bushlands, and woodlands. They are analyzing how the animals’ movement patterns within each of these habitats relates to their distance to a water source, or, for example, whether the distance to water affects how elephants move while in woodlands versus when they are in open grasslands.Tshipa and colleagues are also beginning a study of the role that the quality and quantity of elephants’ food plays in their migration. All the study elephants used the same general area in the dry season, so the quality of food in their dry-season ranges is unlikely to drive some to migrate and others to remain in the area. Given the substantial energy expended in long-distance migration, the researchers will examine the amount of suitable wet-season food along transects as well as the dung of the tagged elephants, to determine what they are eating (e.g. higher-quality grasses versus bark).CitationTshipa, A., Valls-Fox, H., Fritz, H., Collins, K., Sebele, L., Mundy, P., & Chamaillé-Jammes, S. (2017). Partial migration links local surface-water management to large-scale elephant conservation in the world’s largest transfrontier conservation area. Biological Conservation, 215, 46-50.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palmintericenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Secondary forests in Costa Rica are re-cleared within decades

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Secondary forests in Costa Rica, which are important for the country’s reforestation and climate change goals, don’t last long enough to recover previously lost biomass and biodiversity, a new study shows.Within 20 years, half of the secondary forest in a region of Coto Brus was cleared. After 54 years, 85 percent of these young forests were gone. The results contradict national reports of increasing forest coverage.Costa Rica should shift from its current commitment to restore 1 million hectares of degraded land by 2020 to longer-term commitments to ensure the persistence of young forests, researchers propose. Secondary forests — those that regrow naturally after being cleared or degraded — constitute more than half of existing tropical forests. When they are old enough, they support a wide range of species and store carbon at a higher rate than old-growth forest because the trees grow more rapidly.But in southern Costa Rica, a country with strong environmental commitments, young forests are ephemeral, a new study claims.When Leighton Reid, a restoration ecologist at the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis, and his colleagues studied the history of secondary forests in a region of Coto Brus canton, Costa Rica, they found that half of them were re-cleared within 20 years. And within 54 years, 85 percent of these young forests were gone, the team reported recently in Conservation Letters.“I wasn’t expecting this at all,” said Reid, who has worked in Costa Rica for more than a decade studying tropical forest restoration. “I was shocked.”A trail through secondary forest at the Las Cruces Biological Station in southern Costa Rica. Photo by J. Leighton Reid.Previous estimates have suggested that 20 years is not enough time for a secondary forest to regain old-growth levels of biomass and biodiversity.To study the persistence of these young forests, researchers used aerial photographs taken from 1947 through 2014 across a 320 square kilometer (123.5 square miles) area in Coto Brus. The photos have a spatial resolution of 10 meters, sharper than the 30-meter resolution of Landsat satellite data other scientists have used to assess forest persistence.Detailed analysis of images from five time points revealed that young forests in the area vanished again at a rate of 2.2 percent to 3.5 percent per year. Similar research has shown even higher clearance rates in northern Costa Rica and in other Latin American forests — for instance, as high as 23 percent per year in central Peru, according to a 2017 study.Naomi Schwartz, a forest ecologist at the University of Minnesota and lead author of the Peru study, is not surprised by the Costa Rica results. “The general finding is consistent with what we found,” she said. “You can’t just assume that a new forest that emerges will be still there in 10, 20, or 50 years.”The forests might be cleared primarily for agriculture and livestock, Reid said. However, his team would like to collaborate with social scientists in Costa Rica to study why the forests are destroyed again so quickly. “It’s an important missing component of our study,” he said. He did note one positive finding: Secondary forests near rivers in the study area were left untouched.The results are not universally accepted within Costa Rica. “The study is restricted to a very small portion of the area of the country, which might not be representative of reality,” wrote Luis Guillermo Acosta Vargas, a forest engineer at the Costa Rica Institute of Technology, in an email to Mongabay. He added that the results also contradict the country’s data of overall recovery of forest coverage, which indicates that Costa Rica has increased its forest area since the mid 1980s.Changes in forest cover. Image by Rodrigo RuizReid agreed with Acosta Vargas’ remarks, but he stood by his findings: “We do need more data, but so far two out of two studies show that secondary forests in Costa Rica are often cleared when they are still young.”The country implemented a ban on deforestation of mature forests in 1996. However, secondary forests were not protected until 2016, two years after the study’s time series ended. Landowners might have cut down the forests before they reached maturity to keep using the land, according to Reid. “Time will tell whether this legislation changes the decades-long pattern of rapid re-clearing,” he said.An isolated forest fragment surrounded by cattle pastures in southern Costa Rica. Photo by J. Leighton Reid.Costa Rica made an international commitment to restore 1 million hectares of degraded land by 2020, according to the Bonn Challenge. But in light of the new results, Reid would like to see those commitments reshaped into long-term compromises through 2120 to help secondary forests persist.Schwartz agrees. “Countries need to work hard to make sure that reforestation, forest restoration and natural regeneration are a big part of their effort to mitigate climate change,” she said. “They need to make sure these forests stick around.”Citation: Reid, J. L., Fagan, M. E., Lucas, J., Slaughter, J., & Zahawi, R. A. (2018). The ephemerality of secondary forests in southern Costa Rica. Conservation Letters, e12607.Rodrigo Pérez Ortega (@rpocisv) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found here. Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Recovery, Forests, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Secondary Forests, Tropical Forests, UCSC center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Altered forests threaten sustainability of subsistence hunting

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Agriculture, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Birds, Bushmeat, Cloud Forests, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecology, Ecosystem Services, Ecosystem Services Payments, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forest People, Forestry, Forests, Fragmentation, Human Migration, Human Rights, Human-wildlife Conflict, Hunting, Illegal Logging, In-situ Conservation, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Iucn, Land Conflict, Land Reform, Land Rights, Logging, Mammals, Mining, Natural Capital, Palm Oil, Parks, Payments For Ecosystem Services, Poaching, Pollution, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Primary Forests, Primates, Protected Areas, Pulp And Paper, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Ecological Services, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Research, Resource Curse, Roads, Saving Species From Extinction, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Sustainable Development, Sustainable Forest Management, Technology, Threats To Rainforests, Timber, Traditional People, Trees, Tribal Groups, Tropical Forests, Wcs, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade In a commentary, two conservation scientists say that changes to the forests of Central and South America may mean that subsistence hunting there is no longer sustainable.Habitat loss and commercial hunting have put increasing pressure on species, leading to the loss of both biodiversity and a critical source of protein for these communities.The authors suggest that allowing the hunting of only certain species, strengthening parks and reserves, and helping communities find alternative livelihoods and sources of food could help address the problem, though they acknowledge the difficult nature of these solutions. The way humans have changed the forests of Central and South America may be making it impossible for subsistence hunters to continue their way of life, according to two conservation scientists.“No longer can subsistence hunting be seen or managed as a sustainable activity carried out by small, isolated human groups occupying large tracts of natural habitat and using traditional hunting methods,” Galo Zapata‐Ríos, who directs the science program for the Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Ecuador program, said in a statement. “Any approach to the problem must take into account the fundamentally different context in which subsistence hunting occurs in the present day.”Scientists have generally thought that groups that rely on hunting to feed themselves and their families under these conditions — and as it has occurred for generations in some places — could do so without affecting the local survival of certain species.An armadillo taken by hunters. Image by Galo Zapata-Ríos/WCS.But Zapata‐Ríos and his colleague, Esteban Suárez, an ecologist and professor at Universidad San Francisco de Quito, say the widespread impacts humans have had in the “neotropical” forests of the Americas force a rethink of those assumptions.“Any approach to the problem must take into account the fundamentally different context in which subsistence hunting occurs in the present day,” the authors write in a commentary published May 8 in the journal Biotropica.Deforestation for timber and agriculture has carved through the region’s rainforests, leaving smaller and fewer fragmented refuges for species to inhabit. And an influx of people from outside, whether due to oil exploration, mineral extraction, or tourism, has helped fuel larger-scale hunting, sometimes even commercial-scale, they write.Add to that even low levels of subsistence hunting pressure, and the burden could be enough to wipe out some species. Not only does that diminish the biodiversity of the surroundings, but it also robs those very communities of a critical source of food, Zapata‐Ríos and Suárez say.A capybara in Colombia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.The researchers outline several potential remedies, but acknowledge that none are perfect solutions. Wildlife managers could allow subsistence hunting only of certain animals that are numerous or reproduce swiftly enough to cope with the pressure. Parks and reserves with stronger protections could also provide places where animals can escape hunting pressure and thus keep their numbers up.The pair’s research also looked at attempts to incentivize communities to switch to livestock rearing as a way to replace the protein in their diet that hunting historically provided, and, more drastically, projects to resettle subsistence hunters outside key areas that are home to rare or threatened species.One study they cite found that more than two-thirds of a community in India that had been moved from the Bhadra Wildlife Sanctuary “perceived that their quality of life had improved and were satisfied with the outcome of the relocation,” but that’s not always the case.A chestnut-eared aracari in Colombia. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.“There is ample evidence showing that resettlement of human populations in the name of conservation can result in severe social, cultural, and economic impacts that often affect the most marginalized groups among societies,” the team writes.The researchers say that far-reaching initiatives are necessary if we’re to stem the loss of species from the bevy of threats they face. But they also point out the difficult situation that the outside world’s impacts on the region’s ecosystems have put communities of subsistence hunters in.“[W]e give them the tools and expectations of the Western World, and then, we hope that they can succeed at living sustainably, even if we have constantly failed,” the authors write.Banner image of a red howler monkey in Colombia by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.CitationsKaranth, K. K. (2007). Making resettlement work: The case of India’s Bhadra wildlife sanctuary. Biological Conservation, 139, 315–324. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2007.07.004Suarez, E., & Zapata‐Ríos, G. Managing subsistence hunting in the changing landscape of Neotropical rain forests. Biotropica. doi:10.1111/btp.12662FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

NBA: Durant’s mom hurt over ‘vicious’ treatment son got in OKC return

first_imgPoe chides LTFRB exec over termination of motorcycle taxi pilot study LATEST STORIES “The most vicious things you could say, they said about my son tonight. It’s hurtful,” the loving matriarch admitted to ESPN after the heated game.“We poured our heart into this place. Not just him. Our family. This is basketball. This is not whether or not you’re going to make it into heaven.”The 49-year-old mother, who was famously referred to by Durant as “The Real MVP” during his Most Valuable Player acceptance speech back in 2014, could not hide her grief after some fans approached her during the game and uttered obscenities about her son.“They called him a snake, a sellout, a b**ch,” she said. “It’s just a sad day. I understand that they loved him. I do understand it. But the name-calling…It didn’t have to be like this.”Apart from Durant’s emotional return to the city where he spent his first eight seasons, pundits and fans alike were thrilled to see how he’d react against former teammate and fellow All-Star Russell Westbrook.ADVERTISEMENT RELATED STORY:Durant’s mother, the ‘Real MVP,’ subject of Lifetime movieSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ 98% of residents in Taal Volcano’s 14-kilometer danger zone evacuated – DILG Following news that the one-time league MVP hired extra security for his first return to Oklahoma since bolting for the Dubs this summer, Durant poured in 34 points on 12-of-21 shooting and led the defending Western Conference Champions to a 130-114 win.Despite the apparent disdain he got from the home court fans, the 28-year-old seemed unfazed by the hate and even told reporters after the game that he thought the boos “would be a little louder.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC returnBut unfortunately for Kevin, his mother Wanda Durant could not muster the same composure and admitted to have been hurt by the harsh treatment his son received.Just basketball, not whether or not you’re going to heaven Palace: Crisis over ABS-CBN franchise unlikely The match-up did not disappoint, as Westbrook brought in an unparalleled intensity and finished the game with a game-high 47 points and 11 rebounds, albeit in a losing effort.At one point, the once dynamic duo were seen jawing at each other in a heated exchange in the fourth quarter.Kevin Durant and Russell Westbrook👀😤 pic.twitter.com/xZkxT2keHv— NBA Inside Stuff (@NBAInside_Stuff) February 12, 2017In a separate report from USA Today, famed Oklahoma City restaurant Mahogany Prime Steakhouse reportedly turned down Durant’s offer to rent out the entire place after the game.The eight-time All-Star was eventually given a table on the restaurant, even though Westbrook was also sighted in the same establishment after the game.Kevin Durant is eating dinner at Mahogany after all. pic.twitter.com/c6zeZECEjd— Ramona Shelburne (@ramonashelburne) February 12, 2017 Municipal councilor nabbed for indiscriminate firing in Leyte Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite The fiery point guard was reportedly seated in a different area and did not interact with Durant. Khristian Ibarrola ‘The Real MVP’ Wanda Durant did not appreciate OKC fans’ harsh treatment of her son on Sunday. AP file photoAmid a sea of jeers and boos from his former fan base, Kevin Durant and the Golden State Warriors left the Chesapeake Arena with a victory against the Oklahoma City Thunder on Sunday.READ: Durant leads Warriors over Thunder in return to OKCADVERTISEMENT 15 Taal towns now under total lockdown Motorcycle taxis ‘illegal’ starting next week — LTFRB board member Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Wrestling legend Chavo ‘Classic’ Guerrero Sr. passes away at 68 View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more