8 species of birds have possibly gone extinct over past few decades

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Birds, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Forests, Green, Research, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta A new study has found that eight species of birds are likely to have completely disappeared in the past couple of decades.Researchers recommend that three species currently listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List be reclassified as extinct, while one be treated as extinct in the wild.Four more bird species are dangerously close to extinction, if not already there, and should be re-classified as critically endangered (possibly extinct), researchers say. Eight species of birds may have completely disappeared over the past couple of decades, a new study has found. Among these is the Spix’s macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii), a bird that inspired the character of Blu in the 2011 animated film Rio. Found only in Brazil, the bird has not seen in the wild since 2000.Like the Spix’s macaw, several other bird species are believed to have become extinct in recent years. To pinpoint the ones that may already be gone, researchers from BirdLife International, a global partnership of conservation organizations focusing on bird conservation, looked at 51 species of birds with a “reasonable possibility of being extinct.” These are species that have either not been seen in the wild for more than 10 years despite exhaustive surveys, or species that have been seen within the last 10 years, but whose tiny population has suffered well-documented decline.Stuart Butchart, BirdLife’s chief scientist, and his colleagues used a new statistical approach to arrive at the probability of extinction for the 51 species by combining information on the intensity of threats to the bird species, timing and reliability of records for the species, as well as timing and quality of efforts made to survey the species.Based on their results, the researchers recommend that three species currently listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List be reclassified as extinct. These include the cryptic treehunter (Cichlocolaptes mazarbarnetti), last seen in the wild in 2007; the Alagoas foliage-gleaner (Philydor novaesi), not seen in the wild since 2011; and the poʻo-uli (Melamprosops phaeosoma), not seen since 2004. The Spix’s macaw, which has some individuals surviving in captivity, should be reclassified as extinct in the wild, the researchers say in the study published in Biological Conservation.A poʻo-uli, or black-faced honeycreeper. Image © ciro_albano.Four more bird species are dangerously close to extinction, if not already there, the team found. These species — the New Caledonian lorikeet (Charmosyna diadema), the Javan lapwing (Vanellus macropterus), the Pernambuco pygmy owl (Glaucidium mooreorum) and the glaucous macaw (Anodorhynchus glaucus) — should be treated as critically endangered (possibly extinct), the researchers say. The “possibly extinct” tag applies to a subset of critically endangered species that are, based on available evidence, likely to be extinct. However, there could be local reports of the species that need verification, or there could be a small chance that future surveys might confirm the species’ presence.While most bird extinctions have previously occurred on islands, the rate of extinctions on continents is now increasing, the study found, driven mainly by deforestation and habitat loss, invasive species, and hunting and trapping. Five of the eight confirmed or suspected extinctions took place in South America. Of these, four occurred in Brazil, demonstrating how rampant deforestation is driving species extinctions, the researchers say.“Ninety per cent of bird extinctions in recent centuries have been of species on islands,” Butchart said in a statement. “However, our results confirm that there is a growing wave of extinctions sweeping across the continents, driven mainly by habitat loss and degradation from unsustainable agriculture and logging.”A Spix’s Macaw. Image © Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation.Citation:Butchart, S. H., Lowe, S., Martin, R. W., Symes, A., Westrip, J. R., & Wheatley, H. (2018). Which bird species have gone extinct? A novel quantitative classification approach. Biological Conservation, 227, 9-18.*Correction (09/09/2018): The photograph of poʻo-uli in the story originally mis-identified the bird as an Alagoas foliage-gleaner. We have corrected the caption. We thank our readers for pointing out the error.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Secondary forests in Costa Rica are re-cleared within decades

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Secondary forests in Costa Rica, which are important for the country’s reforestation and climate change goals, don’t last long enough to recover previously lost biomass and biodiversity, a new study shows.Within 20 years, half of the secondary forest in a region of Coto Brus was cleared. After 54 years, 85 percent of these young forests were gone. The results contradict national reports of increasing forest coverage.Costa Rica should shift from its current commitment to restore 1 million hectares of degraded land by 2020 to longer-term commitments to ensure the persistence of young forests, researchers propose. Secondary forests — those that regrow naturally after being cleared or degraded — constitute more than half of existing tropical forests. When they are old enough, they support a wide range of species and store carbon at a higher rate than old-growth forest because the trees grow more rapidly.But in southern Costa Rica, a country with strong environmental commitments, young forests are ephemeral, a new study claims.When Leighton Reid, a restoration ecologist at the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis, and his colleagues studied the history of secondary forests in a region of Coto Brus canton, Costa Rica, they found that half of them were re-cleared within 20 years. And within 54 years, 85 percent of these young forests were gone, the team reported recently in Conservation Letters.“I wasn’t expecting this at all,” said Reid, who has worked in Costa Rica for more than a decade studying tropical forest restoration. “I was shocked.”A trail through secondary forest at the Las Cruces Biological Station in southern Costa Rica. Photo by J. Leighton Reid.Previous estimates have suggested that 20 years is not enough time for a secondary forest to regain old-growth levels of biomass and biodiversity.To study the persistence of these young forests, researchers used aerial photographs taken from 1947 through 2014 across a 320 square kilometer (123.5 square miles) area in Coto Brus. The photos have a spatial resolution of 10 meters, sharper than the 30-meter resolution of Landsat satellite data other scientists have used to assess forest persistence.Detailed analysis of images from five time points revealed that young forests in the area vanished again at a rate of 2.2 percent to 3.5 percent per year. Similar research has shown even higher clearance rates in northern Costa Rica and in other Latin American forests — for instance, as high as 23 percent per year in central Peru, according to a 2017 study.Naomi Schwartz, a forest ecologist at the University of Minnesota and lead author of the Peru study, is not surprised by the Costa Rica results. “The general finding is consistent with what we found,” she said. “You can’t just assume that a new forest that emerges will be still there in 10, 20, or 50 years.”The forests might be cleared primarily for agriculture and livestock, Reid said. However, his team would like to collaborate with social scientists in Costa Rica to study why the forests are destroyed again so quickly. “It’s an important missing component of our study,” he said. He did note one positive finding: Secondary forests near rivers in the study area were left untouched.The results are not universally accepted within Costa Rica. “The study is restricted to a very small portion of the area of the country, which might not be representative of reality,” wrote Luis Guillermo Acosta Vargas, a forest engineer at the Costa Rica Institute of Technology, in an email to Mongabay. He added that the results also contradict the country’s data of overall recovery of forest coverage, which indicates that Costa Rica has increased its forest area since the mid 1980s.Changes in forest cover. Image by Rodrigo RuizReid agreed with Acosta Vargas’ remarks, but he stood by his findings: “We do need more data, but so far two out of two studies show that secondary forests in Costa Rica are often cleared when they are still young.”The country implemented a ban on deforestation of mature forests in 1996. However, secondary forests were not protected until 2016, two years after the study’s time series ended. Landowners might have cut down the forests before they reached maturity to keep using the land, according to Reid. “Time will tell whether this legislation changes the decades-long pattern of rapid re-clearing,” he said.An isolated forest fragment surrounded by cattle pastures in southern Costa Rica. Photo by J. Leighton Reid.Costa Rica made an international commitment to restore 1 million hectares of degraded land by 2020, according to the Bonn Challenge. But in light of the new results, Reid would like to see those commitments reshaped into long-term compromises through 2120 to help secondary forests persist.Schwartz agrees. “Countries need to work hard to make sure that reforestation, forest restoration and natural regeneration are a big part of their effort to mitigate climate change,” she said. “They need to make sure these forests stick around.”Citation: Reid, J. L., Fagan, M. E., Lucas, J., Slaughter, J., & Zahawi, R. A. (2018). The ephemerality of secondary forests in southern Costa Rica. Conservation Letters, e12607.Rodrigo Pérez Ortega (@rpocisv) is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found here. Conservation, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Recovery, Forests, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Secondary Forests, Tropical Forests, UCSC center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

David Dunn appointed permanent Oldham manager

first_imgFormer Blackburn and England midfielder David Dunn has been appointed as the new manager of Oldham Athletic.The 35-year-old joined the League One side as a player in the summer and signed a one-year contract.However, following the sacking of Darren Kelly in September, Dunn was placed in temporary charge and he has now been given the job on a full-time basis.“Everyone at the club has been very impressed with the way David has gone about his business since taking over the reins on an interim basis,” chairman Simon Corney told Oldham’s official website.“His dedication, hard work and exacting standards have already had a positive effect on the club and the way he has approached the role has made it impossible for us not to give him his chance. “We believe his ambition, skills and positive influence will be pivotal to the club’s progression.” 1 New Oldham manager David Dunn last_img read more

US employers added a stellar 312000 jobs in December

first_imgWASHINGTON — U.S. employers dramatically stepped up their hiring in December, adding 312,000 jobs in an encouraging display of strength for an economy in the midst of a trade war, slowing global growth and a partial shutdown of the federal government.The Labor Department says the unemployment rate rose slightly to 3.9 per cent, but that reflected a surge in jobseekers— a positive for growth.Average hourly pay improved 3.2 per cent from a year ago.The health care, food services, construction, and manufacturing sectors were the primary contributors to last month’s hiring.The strong job gains suggest that the tumbling stock market has yet to depress expectations that the economy will expand for a 10th straight year. Still, growth is likely to slow as the stimulus from last year’s tax cuts wane.Josh Boak, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Council wants to create a Community Foundation to help fund the community

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – City Council directed city staff to request a proposal to engage a consultant for a community foundation for Fort St. John.The foundation, a philanthropic organization would be focused on building permanent endowments to tackle long-term community challenges, shares Ryan Harvey Communications Coordinator for the City of Fort St. John.Harvey goes on to share, that as part of the Site C dam, there is the Regional Legacy Benefits agreement (found as part of the BC Hydro Community Measures Agreement; CLICK HERE ) that will provide funding of approximately $58 million over 70 years following completion. Mayor Lori Ackerman shared, right now the city spends a significant amount on ‘Grants in Aid’ and permissive tax exemptions.  When the community foundation (CF) is established, the funding could come from the CF rather than our operating budget.As the community grows, so too are the requests for assistance.  A CF can determine its ability to fund based on its revenues from the fund’s investments and accommodate the decisions year round rather than a once a year budget, shared Mayor AckermanTo view more; CLICK HERElast_img read more

Floyd Mayweather Goes to Prison Today a Sign of

The face of boxing steps into prison today, an 87-day stint that defines the sport as much as it defines the times and the man.That is not a compliment.It, in fact, is an indictment—on boxing, the world we live in and Floyd Mayweather, Jr.With an opportunity to represent himself and his sport in an upstanding fashion, Mayweather, instead, has failed boxing and himself. And there does not seem to be any outrage about it.The best boxer in the world gets locked up on a domestic violence charge stemming from a September 2010 incident during which he pled guilty to pulling the hair and twisting the arm of the mother of three of his children. His sons, 10 and 8 at the time, were there when he also threatened and hit ex-girlfriend Josie Harris. The older boy ran out a back door to fetch a security guard in the gated community.Sadly, boxing did nothing. No admonishment. No suspension. Nothing. So it’s no wonder that after all that, when he leaves the Clark County Detention Center in Las Vegas near the end of summer, he will have actually augmented his stature, his “street cred,” among many who deem it some warped mark of proud distinction to have been locked up.In one of his many and sometimes mindless rants about one thing or another during his remarkable boxing career, Mayweather, 35, has more than once invoked the name Muhammad Ali in relation to himself, a juxtaposition that is ludicrous, but interesting on this day in one way.Ali once went to jail, too. And that’s where the comparisons should end, for Ali stood for something, whether you agreed with his position or not.With the travesty of the Vietnam War getting even worse in 1967, Ali was called up for induction into the armed forces. Back then, men were drafted and had to serve or face jail time. Ali still refused because of religious beliefs. He also said: “I ain’t got no quarrel with them Vietcong. Ain’t no Vietcong ever called me (the N word).”Ali’s refusal got him some jail time. Bigger was the national uproar it caused. His boxing license was cancelled by most states. He was stripped of his title, had his passport confiscated and did not fight for 2 ½ years. Instead of pouting, Ali lectured at colleges and Muslim gatherings around the nation, gaining support as antiwar sentiment increased. In June 1971, the Supreme Court reversed his conviction, ruling that he was entitled to an exemption as a conscientious objector.That little history lesson should show how Ali and Mayweather are comparable only that they starred in the same sport. That’s it.Here’s what Mayweather said on HBO: “I’m in the same shoes as Ali. They hate me when I’m at the top, but once my career is over, they’re going to miss me.”On his domestic violence case, he said: “I took the plea. Sometimes they put us in a no-win situation. I had no choice, but I don’t worry about going to jail. Better men than me have been there. I’m pretty sure Martin Luther King’s been there, and Malcolm X. I have taken the good with the good so I’ll accept the bad with the bad.”Sign of the times: Mayweather was sentenced on December 22, 2011, but judge Melissa Saragosa agreed at the last minute to let him remain free long enough to fight Miguel Cotto on May 5 in Las Vegas, which he did last month and earned more than $32 million—and injected millions more into Sargosa’s city’s economy.Well, the money cannot help Mayweather now. He likely will not be able to train while in prison. For the first week or so, Mayweather will be segregated for his protection from the other 3,200 inmates. He’ll get one hour of exercise time a day outside his cell.It could be worse for Mayweather. He could be a convicted rapist like Mike Tyson. Or maybe a miracle could happen: He could exit a new man of character and community ambition.Don’t bet on it, though.Curtis Bunn is a best-selling novelist and national award-winning sports journalist who has worked at The Washington Times, NY Newsday, The New York Daily News and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. read more

Mens soccer splits weekend matches in Tulsa Okla

Shelby Lum / Photo editorJunior midfielder Ryan Ivancic races his opponent to the ball during a game against IPFW Aug. 20, at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. OSU won, 2-0.The Ohio State men’s soccer team defeated the Southern Methodist University Mustangs, 1-0, Sunday in the second day of the Holiday Inn City Center Golden Hurricane Classic in Tulsa, Okla.Both teams were coming off a Friday loss, and were trying to end the weekend with some momentum. OSU was outshot by the Mustangs 10-2 Sunday, but Buckeye senior forward Denio Leone scored the game’s only goal late in the second half to secure the 1-0 victory for his team.Coach John Bluem said his team escaped from the match after facing heavy pressure from the Mustangs.“We were under a lot of pressure, especially in the second half,” Bluem said in a phone interview after the game. “We had a really nice goal from a senior and got away with a win.”SMU outshot the Buckeyes in the first half 2-1, but neither team found a way to put the ball in the net. Buckeye junior goalkeeper Alex Ivanov, who was named Big Ten Defensive Player of the Week last week, kept the Buckeyes alive throughout the first half by saving both shots SMU took.OSU’s only shot of the first half came when senior forward Alex Harrison took a header towards the goal but hit it high.SMU opened up the second half playing aggressive on offense, taking four shots and three corners within the first 10 minutes. Ivanov saved two more shots, and he finished the match with six saves on the way to securing his second career shutout.Bluem praised the play of the younger players on the team, and their ability to comeback from a tough start to the weekend.“We are a young team and we talked about bouncing back like we did last weekend,” Bluem said. “The guys answered well.”Although OSU was outshot 8-1, that one shot proved to be all that it needed. Leone received a cross from the right side of the field from freshman defender Tyler Kidwell, one-touching it into the goal from about eight yards to tally his first career goal.OSU fell to No. 22 ranked Tulsa, 4-1, Friday in its first game of the Classic. The team’s lone goal came from freshman midfielder Christian Soldat, and it was the first in his career. Tulsa coach Tom McIntosh earned his 200th career win in the process.Bluem was not pleased with his teams performance, but said that Tulsa deserved to win.“It was a hard weekend — it was almost 100 degrees,” Bluem said. “The Friday game against Tulsa was not a good game. They are a really good team.”The Buckeyes are scheduled to continue regular season play when they take on Bowling Green next Friday. Kickoff is set for 7 p.m. in Bowling Green, Ohio. read more

Mens Basketball Ohio State hopes to rebound from heartbreaking loss with game

Ohio State redshirt senior guard Kam Williams walks up the court between free throws during the second half of a game against Texas Southern at the Schottenstein Center on Nov. 16. Credit: Nick Clarkson | Social Media EditorThe Ohio State men’s basketball team (5-2) returned to Columbus late Sunday night from the PK80 Invitational in Portland, Oregon following a 67-66 loss to Butler.The Buckeyes blew a 15-point lead in the final four minutes and lost in overtime. Ahead of his team’s Wednesday showdown against Clemson (5-1), head coach Chris Holtmann said he’s trying to find balance between allowing his team to rest and preparing for its fourth straight high-major opponent.“From what I’ve been able to watch, I really like this Clemson team. I think they’re older, they’re skilled, Brad [Brownell] does a great job,” Holtmann said. “So it’s gonna be a fun challenge for us, and we’re excited about it and excited to prepare.”Clemson has demonstrated improved accuracy from the field this season, making 50.3 percent of shot attempts. Ohio State has shot 46.1 percent from the field.Veteran forwards Keita Bates-Diop and Jae’Sean Tate have led the Buckeyes with 16.9 points and 10.3 rebounds per game, and 13.7 points and 7.3 rebounds, respectively. The Tigers are led by forwards senior Donte Grantham and junior Elijah Thomas. Grantham averages 16 points and six rebounds per game, shooting 69.8 percent from the field and 47.6 percent from the 3-point line. Thomas averages 13 points and 9.2 rebounds per game, shooting 70.5 percent from the field. Freshman forward Kaleb Wesson said defending Clemson’s big men will require more than just a few players giving effort defensively.“It’s gonna have to be a team effort,” Wesson said. “If people [are] shooting 70 percent from the floor, that means they’re getting good shots. They’re not shooting bad shots, so everybody got to join in and guard everybody.”The Tigers do not solely rely on their big men, however. Each of their starters averages 11-plus points per game. They also have multiple threats from 3-point distance. In addition to Grantham, senior guard Gabe Devoe makes nearly two 3-pointers per game at a 39.3 percent clip and redshirt senior forward/center Mark Donnal has made five of seven shots from beyond the arc.Ohio State has not defended the perimeter well this season, allowing more than eight 3-pointers per game. Holtmann said that’s an area that could decide the game.“We’ve not defended the 3 as well as I would have hoped,” Holtmann said. “And overall, we’ve defended well. We have been pretty solid defensively. I wish we would defend the 3 a little bit better but that’s certainly going to be important tomorrow.”Ohio State has shot poorly so far this season and struggled with turnovers, which makes defending on the other end of the floor that much more important in maximizing possessions.“We just gonna have to execute on defense,” redshirt senior guard Kam Williams said. “We just got to lock in ― try to string three stops in a row, five stops in a row. We not gonna shut them out, but if we just stay connected on the defensive end, hopefully that will just help us out and put less pressure on our offense.”The Buckeyes also will need to win the battle inside to win the game given Clemson’s talented frontcourt. The Buckeyes have outrebounded opponents 41.1-32 on average, while the Tigers have outrebounded opponents 38-30.Holtmann said sophomore center Micah Potter did not play much against Butler because of his lingering ankle injury. Wesson has started in Potter’s place and will need to step up in the paint against Clemson, especially if Potter continues to be limited.Ohio State has given out 5,000 student tickets already as part of the free student ticket giveaway in an attempt to generate a home-court advantage with a larger, and potentially louder, crowd, Holtmann said. “I think every time you go out you have an opportunity to kind of define who you are and who you want to be as a team and as a program,” Holtmann said. “And that’ll be the case certainly tomorrow against a really quality opponent.” read more

Tiny cabins get test run as alternative housing

first_imgTiny cabins get test run as alternative housing 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — A small cabin went up today in San Diego’s East Village that can become the start of something much bigger.On Friday, Amikas installed a demonstration model of the Emergency Sleeping Cabin that the organization seeks to introduce as emergency bridge housing in San Diego.This donation is part of Amikas’ ongoing efforts to introduce these emergency sleeping cabins as an option to bridge the gap between living in the Alpha Project Temporary Bridge Shelter and living in permanent housing.The non-profit seeks to house women and children in a pilot community of ten to twenty of these cabins.For now, the donation to Alpha Project marks a big step toward getting the shelters accepted by the local non-profit community that helps the homeless. Posted: September 7, 2018 September 7, 2018 Sasha Foo, Sasha Foo Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more