D.C. Everest sweeps singles, edge Marshfield girls tennis

first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterMARSHFIELD – D.C. Everest swept the four singles matches and remained unbeaten in the Wisconsin Valley Conference, edging Marshfield 4-3 in a dual match Tuesday at Boson Courts.Marshfield won all three doubles matches but couldn’t break through in singles in its home finale.Olivia Haessly and Emily Serchen won at No. 1 doubles, Martha Kupfer and Jenny Madden did not lose a game at No. 2, and Autumn Packard and Krishna Patel swept two sets at No. 3 for Marshfield.The Tigers dropped two tight matches in singles. Ashley Schultz lost to Kenzie Bradley at No. 2, 7-6, 7-5, and Hanah Gadke took Carmen Gennermann to three sets at No. 3, but fell 7-6, 4-6, 6-1.Marshfield (3-2 Wisconsin Valley Conference) wraps up its conference dual meet schedule Thursday at Wausau East.D.C. Everest 4, Marshfield 3Singles: 1. Gabi Kitchell (DC) def. Lara Prebble 6-1, 6-0; 2. Kenzie Bradley (DC) def. Ashley Schultz 7-6 (5), 7-5; 3. Carmen Gennermann (DC) def. Hanah Gadke 7-6 (0), 4-6, 6-1; 4. Nicole Williams (DC) def. Maggie Schreiner 6-2, 6-4.Doubles: 1. Olivia Haessly-Emily Serchen (M) def. Emily Adams-Kristin Holue 6-3, 6-1; 2. Martha Kupfer-Jenny Madden (M) def. Taylor Melk-Kaylee Heiting 6-0, 6-0; 3. Autumn Packard-Krishna Patel (M) def. Ryanne Wolfe-Megan Ninnemann 6-2, 6-1.Records: D.C. Everest 5-0 Wisconsin Valley Conference; Marshfield 3-2 WVC.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of  MarshfieldAreaSports.com).last_img read more

Xiaomi unveils special Cherry Pink edition of Mi Note

first_imgAfter unveiling the Redmi 2 variant, Redmi 2A during the fifth anniversary of the company, Xiaomi has now introduced a special edition of the Mi Note. It will also come along with a 5000 mAh power bank and be packed in a pink box. Xiaomi has claimed that the smartphone has been colored using enhanced blasting technology for a uniformly cherry pink color.The specifications will be similar to the Mi Note. Which means the smartphone will sport a 5.7-inch IPS display with Corning Gorilla Glass 3 protection, 2.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon 801 processor with Adreno 330 GPU, 3GB RAM, 16GB internal memory, Android 4.4 KitKat with MIUI, and dual-sim support. Other features include a 13MP rear camera with dual-tone LED flash, 4K video recording, 4MP front camera, 4G LTE, and a 3000mAH battery. Some connectivity options include WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct, Bluetooth 4.1, and GPS. The special edition is priced at 2499 Yuan (roughly Rs 25,215) and will go on sale starting from April 8.last_img read more

TOUCH FOOTBALL AUSTRALIA ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING POSTPONED

first_imgIt is with regret that we advise that the Touch Football Australia (TFA) Annual General Meeting scheduled for the 10 November 2007, has been postponed until further notice.Due to the requirements of the Australian Capital Territory Incorporations Act, TFA will be unable to continue with the meeting.  There has been a dramatic change in the scope of the organisation and it is imperative that under the direction of the new Chief Executive Officer and Board of Management that all matters are checked with due diligence.  Whilst it is unfortunate that this issue has delayed the process, it is also important that the reports are accurate.  TFA ask for your support and understanding as members of the Touch Football community.last_img read more

Video: NC State Football Released The Worst Rendition Of Taylor Swift’s “Shake It Off” In History

first_imgA solo shot of Taylor Swift.BEVERLY HILLS, CA – JANUARY 06: Taylor Swift attends the InStyle And Warner Bros. Golden Globes After Party 2019 at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 6, 2019 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images)Pop superstar Taylor Swift is going to be in Raleigh Tuesday night for the next stop on her 1989 World Tour. Apparently, NC State’s football team would appreciate if she stopped by to say hello while she’s in town. Unfortunately, that means that they produced the world’s worst “Shake It Off” parody video (and that’s saying something).There isn’t much else we can say to prepare you for this, so, here:Hey @TaylorSwift13 we did THIS to get you to come see us when you’re in town tomorrow! https://t.co/mSO3LoTHbY pic.twitter.com/h2apnYX26p— NC State Football (@PackFootball) June 8, 2015We somehow doubt that it’s going to persuade her to join them in their weight room.last_img read more

PRRD hosting Connecting Communities Trails Workshop Tuesday

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. -The Peace River Regional District is hosting their Connecting Communities Trails Workshop this Tuesday.The workshop aims to investigate the feasibility of trails that could connect Dawson Creek with Pouce Coupe, and Fort St John with Charlie Lake. The study will consider possible routes, types of uses, as well as costs and benefits of building trails.The PRRD is looking for the public’s help in giving feedback on why they believe the communities need the trails. Feedback will be integral in determining whether the PRRD will develop the trails in the long run. Costs of the project will depend on the public’s feedback. For example, paved trails would cost more than gravel trails.Once the feasibility study concludes it will be brought forward to the Regional Board to consider whether the project moves to the construction phase.The workshop will be held at the North Peace Cultural Centre from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. this Tuesday.last_img read more

Your neighbourhood may make you obese

first_imgMoving to a neighbourhood with a high obesity rate is likely to make a person become overweight, say researchers who suggest that your social circles can inadvertently influence your weight. “Social contagion in obesity means that if more people around you are obese, then that may increase your own chances of becoming obese,” said Ashlesha Datar, a senior economist at University of Southern California in the US. “In other words, living in a community where obesity is more common can make sedentary lifestyles, unhealthy eating and overweight or obesity more socially acceptable,” said Datar, one of the authors of the study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainObesity is linked to many factors, including eating and exercise habits, genetics and the environment. Research shows that living in certain communities carries a higher risk of obesity than living in other communities, but this association has been challenging for scientists to explain. Researchers studied military families to assess whether living in communities with greater obesity increased their own risk of being overweight or obese. Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma AwardMilitary families, they reasoned, cannot choose where they live –rather, they are assigned to installations. Some of those installations are in counties with higher rates of obesity. “We found that the families assigned to installations in counties with higher obesity rates were more likely to be overweight or obese than those assigned to installations in counties with lower rates of obesity,” Datar said. The researchers recruited families of US Army personnel at 38 military installations in the country to participate in surveys and measurements. In all, 1,314 parents and 1,111 children participated. Three-fourths of the parents and about one-fourth of the children were overweight or obese – reflective of the national rates. Researchers found that the family’s risk of obesity may increase or decrease, depending on the county obesity rate where they live. Moving to a county with a lower rate decreases the family’s chances of becoming overweight or obese. To assess whether shared environments could explain these results, the study accounted for extensive data on the food and activity opportunities in the county and neighbourhood, such as gyms and grocery stores.last_img read more

Social media and elections

first_img“Is this India’s first social media election?” asked BBC on its website in April 2014, during India’s last general elections. That time the country had just 20 crore (200 million) people with access to the internet. Such was the engagement of the then prime ministerial candidate Narendra Modi on social media platforms that everybody feted him as a moderniser and a powerful campaigner who could only be compared to Barack Obama. The former president of the United States of America was considered as the most social-media friendly candidate who reaped the benefit of interacting on these platforms. India is once again in the process of its general elections. In the last five years, the novelty of social media has not wavered. Rather, it has become a natural part of election campaigns with all political parties and leaders marking their presence. Also Read – A special kind of bondIndia now has 560 million people with access to the internet. It is also the largest market for Facebook and WhatsApp in the world, while Twitter treats the country as one of its crucial and expanding markets. News reports indicate huge advertising budgets being earmarked by political parties for social media.But there are cautions this time. The threat of fake news looms large. Starting from the Election Commission of India (ECI) to the respective companies, there is a seemingly deliberate effort to curb misuse of these platforms. But, the social media platforms have also been used by civil society and advocacy groups for disseminating development news. Also Read – Insider threat managementA casual Google search with the keywords “social media”, “impact” and “development news” shows up close to 215 million results. It is not humanly possible to verify all the results, but it gives a peep into how big the virtual world is and how vigorously people are sharing content. We are certainly making a transition from a “searching” to a “dissemination” mode in the virtual world. And the social media has emerged as the clear driver of this transition. This is particularly true for development news. The pertinent question is whether development news influence voters this election season? This question takes credence because polarisation on communal lines, through social media, is turning out to be effective. To change the narrative of elections, can social media be effective in replacing this with development news? Or, to simply put, can a development agenda be brought into focus using social media? The social media is unique as it is highly informal, yet, is the most organised congregation of people. Users are immediately organised based on their choices, trends they are following, and also by their geographical locations. This is what is fuelling the rise of social media as a powerful platform for dissemination as well as the organisation of opinion around social issues. Whether it is about a small movement to save a patch of forest in Peru or a jalsamadhi campaign against a big dam project in a remote district in India, social media is not only the first place to break news but is also a powerful platform to build a campaign. For a journalist like me, it has become almost a necessity to refer to Facebook as frequently as to television channels that supposedly break news first! It is the new common pool resource that is being aggressively pursued. The flipside The social media has its share of problems that may impact the very cause it is promoting. First, it has emerged as the biggest strategic decision that has yielded results in terms of achieving fast dissemination and seeking immediate reactions for a social cause. This means that even before an issue emerges in its entirety, it is open for public opinions. Second, many campaigns around development issues are exclusively targeted at social media. There may be logical reasons for this but the strategy seems to be dominantly focused on certain sections of the society that utilise it. The threat is that by default, social media has become a polarising factor, even though most debates are not well-informed. It has become a free space to throw personal biases and park opinions without any restraint. Therefore, any cause disseminated on social media immediately polarises the debate. This is particularly true for campaigns having political overtones. Social media played a decisive role in generating the perception that the government is “anti-farmer” or “pro-business”. But in the passionate debates that colonised the virtual world, the debate simply got polarised into “pro and anti-government rhetoric”. Such situations have forced political parties to deploy substantial resources to intervene in such debates. The third threat is from the social media itself: Will it disconnect the people and the groups from those self-mandated to fight the battle on their behalf? If there is a disconnect, then the strategic leadership of a campaign shifts to the latter. This is not an ideal situation for public advocacy where the subject concerned doesn’t get active participation. Development campaigns in India involve people who are very poor and the least advantaged in terms of access to communication. A mobile phone might have become a bigger necessity than a toilet in rural areas, but this doesn’t mean that the instrument is being used to directly involve them in campaigns that talk about them. Researchers are currently studying the impact of social media on social causes. Though the trends are positive in terms of garnering attention for such causes, we are not sure whether it has impacted positively on the outcome of the campaigns. In the meantime, we should continue to “reset” the virtual world but with caution. (The author is Managing Editor, Down To Earth and writes on rural affairs and development matters. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

Martin and Snyder reach championship but Ohio State wrestling drops to 5th

OSU coach Tom Ryan congratulates freshman Myles Martin on a quarterfinals win at the NCAA championships at Madison Square Garden.Credit: Courtesy of Ben Solomon | OSU AthleticsNEW YORK CITY — The repeat title hopes for Ohio State wrestling have all but faded away after a rough second day at the NCAA tournament.After the first session of the day advanced four wrestlers to the semifinals, the Buckeyes sustained brutal loses in the 125-, 141- and 165-pound weight classes. The ability for OSU to close out matches and secure early wins like last season was nowhere to be found.Things weren’t all bad for the Scarlet and Gray, though, as two Buckeyes, freshman Myles Martin and sophomore Kyle Snyder, earned their way into the championship round.Session IIIThe Buckeyes entered Day 2 hot on the heels of Penn State and deadlocked with Oklahoma State. Midway through the second day, the story was the same for the Scarlet and Gray.OSU finished the morning session with second place all to itself. Penn State, however, stretched out its lead to 14.5 points.Both redshirt freshman Micah Jordan and redshirt senior Johnni DiJulius lost matches in the morning session. DiJulius was eliminated from the competition, while Jordan moved to the consolation bracket to fight for third place.However, four wrestlers advanced in the tournament, moving on to the semifinal round. All but one of this group reached the same round last year.Redshirt sophomore Nate Tomasello won by decision, and both redshirt sophomore Bo Jordan and Snyder earned major decision wins in the quarterfinals.As for the fourth Buckeye to earn a spot in the semifinals, the true freshman Martin, a defensive strategy paid dividends to advance the Penns Grove, New Jersey, product into the next round.Martin rode out the entire second period and picked up an escape in the third for the win. He appeared extremely confident following the match’s conclusion and not at all concerned with the pressure despite the big stage.“I wrestle guys in the room every day that are world champions, All-Americans, national champions,” Martin said. “That helps my confidence a lot when I’m competing with these guys.”Session IVMadison Square Garden erupted at the start of the semifinals, then looked on in awe as Thomas Gilman of Iowa upset Tomasello in overtime. This was the first loss for Tomasello in over 40 matches of his college career.Tomasello was driven to the mat and pinned in overtime, silencing the OSU faithful in attendance to a gasp. Last year’s national champion at 125 pounds was visibly distraught after the defeat.Things would not get better for the Buckeyes at 141 pounds. Micah Jordan lost a 6-2 decision against Randy Cruz of Lehigh. This was the second time in two matches he was the victim of an upset.Trying to get things back on track, Bo Jordan faced an opponent he had yet to beat in three attempts: his cousin, Wisconsin’s Isaac Jordan.Once again, Isaac Jordan got the better of his relative, as he took a 5-4 decision.Finally, after the Buckeyes lost their first three matches of the session, Martin turned things around. The freshman fought hard to gain an 8-2 decision, earning the right to go on to face Bo Nickal of Penn State in the finals.In the final bout of the evening, Snyder remained perfect on the year by beating Ty Walz of Virginia Tech to join Martin in Saturday’s championship round.While proud of the two wrestlers who will represent the Scarlet and Gray in the finals, OSU coach Tom Ryan seemed drained and disheartened after such an overall poor showing in the fourth session.“It’s a tough night, a real tough night,” Ryan said, his raspy voice caused by shouting out instructions seemingly reflecting the overall mood of the team.Ryan did offer praise to both wrestlers moving on to the final stage, especially Martin.“We knew early on with Myles that we had something really special,” Ryan said. “He showed that this weekend.”OSU has now dropped to fifth overall and will be looking to salvage whatever it can Saturday.The morning session is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m., with the evening session slated for 8 p.m. after the parade of All-Americans. read more

Tressel Pryor is our quarterback

After one of the most devastating losses in recent memory, the Ohio State Buckeyes and their coaches begin to look for answers.OSU went to Purdue and was beaten convincingly, 26-18, by a Boilermakers team that had one win, and zero in the Big Ten Conference.“Obviously it was a tough one for us to go drop a game on the road in the conference, but that’s exactly what happened,” coach Jim Tressel said Tuesday during his weekly press conference.Mistakes and missed opportunities plagued OSU against Purdue. The most glaring problem from an offense that only mustered 18 points was the inconsistent play by quarterback Terrelle Pryor.Pryor’s day was highlighted by turnovers. He accounted for four of five on the day. He had two interceptions and three fumbles, two of which were lost to Purdue.The offensive struggles cannot be pinned on him alone, but if the offense is going to start being more consistent, it will have to start with Pryor, Tressel said.In the five wins for OSU this season, Pryor has a 9-5 touchdown to interception ratio and three rushing touchdowns. In the two losses, he has only one touchdown, three interceptions and two lost fumbles.For OSU’s offense to get out of its collective funk, Pryor will need to be more protective of the football, Tressel said.Tressel said that regardless of how ineffective Pryor has looked at times this season, the idea of replacing him with backup Joe Bauserman has never crossed his mind.Last year, quarterback Todd Boeckman was replaced after a forgettable outing against USC. Tressel doesn’t believe that this year’s struggles are comparable to those of last season.“We felt at the time last year that the best thing for the team in order to be successful was to make the decision that we did,” Tressel said. “I’m not sure that they’re comparable at all. They don’t feel to me as being similar situations.”With several questions still unanswered, the Buckeyes (5-2, 3-1) prepare for Homecoming against Minnesota (4-3, 2-2) at noon Saturday.Tressel striving for better preparationRecently, OSU has been known as a team that struggles to beat quality opponents. As bad as that may seem, the Buckeyes’ saving grace has been that they rarely, if ever, lose to inferior opponents.That wasn’t the case Saturday.“We didn’t do the things that you need to do to be successful,” Tressel said. “What we asked ourselves and our team to do was first and foremost … think about what is it that I could do better.”The letdown against Purdue started with the coaching staff not adequately preparing the Buckeyes for the challenge they would face.The Boilermakers are a much better team than their record indicates. Letdowns like the one Saturday occur when teams don’t give enough credit to their opponent, junior receiver Dane Sanzenbacher said.“I think we prepared the week like any other game,” he said. “When it came to game time, our focus just might not have been there. As a whole, we may have overlooked that a little bit.”If the Buckeyes weren’t ready mentally for a tough road game at Purdue, it falls back on the coach. In light of the tough loss, Tressel reflected on what he believes his role is in preparing his players.“I know from a coaching standpoint when young people decide to come to Ohio State, and we convince them that this is a great institution and so forth, that one of the things that we want to know for sure is what is it that you’re interested in doing individually, collectively as a team, obviously a million things outside of football, and then you go about trying to coach them, aid them, teach them and so forth in what it takes to accomplish that,” Tressel said.After the surprising loss to the Boilermakers, Tressel knows what he must do to better his team going forward in Big Ten play.“The first reflection that I have personally is that I’ve certainly got to do a better job of helping this group understand what it takes to do the things they would like to do,” he said. Injuries, youth, penalties hurt offensive lineLack of production by the offense doomed the Buckeyes on Saturday, and the lack of quality play by the offensive line is just another reason why.The line gave up five sacks against Purdue but also had five costly penalties that made sustaining drives difficult.Senior Jim Cordle went down during the USC game, and surgery has kept him from making an impact on the struggling line. Cordle could be ready this week.“We tried to get him into the game Saturday, and he just isn’t quite ready,” Tressel said. “It’s one thing being able to be able to go through a practice tempo, and it’s another thing to be able to do it on a Saturday. I like to think he’d be a lot healthier because we kind of took a step back with him. We didn’t leave him in so long that he got banged up.”Fellow veteran Andrew Miller has also been out, but Tressel believes it may finally be time for him to get back in the rotation.“Andrew has practiced a little bit, and I hope he can contribute,” Tressel said. “This will be an important week of practice to see if he can get some weight back on and get some strength back and so forth.” read more

Commentary National Championship of mediocrity was a waste of time

Monday night’s national championship game looked a lot like a Monday Night Football game between the Green Bay Packers and Chicago Bears. I saw Butler’s Ronald Nored do his best Brian Urlacher imitation as he delivered a crushing blow to prevent UConn’s Kemba Walker from sprinting into the open court. I saw Butler shoot 18.8 percent from the field. I saw the two teams combine for 94 points, nine short of the 103 UNLV scored in the 1990 title game by itself. But in the end we all watched the “little guys” from Butler, who lost a heartbreaker in last year’s final to Duke, fall to the supposed Goliath for a second consecutive year. And before the book closes on this college basketball season, who can forget VCU’s darling run from the First Four to the Final Four? Or how about the fact that no No. 1 or No. 2 seed made it to the Final Four? This particular tournament showcased college basketball at its best. It’s a place where parity reigns supreme and in turn supplies hoops fans with incredibly exciting basketball. I think not. First of all, the term “little guys” doesn’t apply to Butler anymore. It’s reached two straight title games. But why has Butler been able to reach the game’s final act two seasons running? Because there’s no such thing as a “mid-major” anymore. The lines in college basketball have been blurred. The well has run dry on great teams because the talent gap between players isn’t as large as it used to be. Kansas coach Bill Self said it best following his team’s loss to VCU in the Elite Eight: “Because seeds are so overrated, it’s about matchups. If we played shirts and skins today you wouldn’t have much of a difference on players or how they look.” Self is absolutely right. Players that go to BCS conference schools have the advantage of going to programs with long histories of success, top-notch facilities and, most importantly, national television exposure. How many times was VCU on national television before the NCAA Tournament? Only five times. Kansas could top that figure in a 10-day period. Yet, through a combination of favorable matchups, hot shooting and an indiscernible talent gap, VCU beat KU like it stole something. So what does all of this mean? College basketball is thoroughly mediocre. Blame kids for falling in love with the 3-point line instead of being able to hit a 16-footer. Blame the NBA’s age limit, which has weakened the NCAA’s top-tier programs. Or blame Michael Jordan, whose game-winning shot in Game 6 of the 1998 NBA Finals has led college basketball (and NBA) teams to believe that isolation is not only a reliable halfcourt offense, but the best end-of-game play call. There’s no such thing as an upset in college basketball anymore. The ranking and seeding systems say otherwise, but until something is done to mend college basketball’s mediocrity, Cinderellas cease to exist and the days of great teams are gone. read more