Springboks give Meyer a winning start

first_img11 June 2012The Springboks gave Heynecke Meyer a winning start in his first match as national coach, beating England 22-17 at Kings Park in Durban on Saturday evening.It was a tight contest and the teams were level at half-time, but the Boks lifted their game in the second half to pull away from the tourists, who scored a late consolation try to pull within seven points of the home side.After the game, Meyer admitted that he had delivered a half-time blast to his charges, which clearly had the desired effect, as South Africa dominated the third quarter of the contest to pull clear.“At some stages I really thought we played great rugby,” he said after the test. “We moved the ball around and I was happy with the result, but we butchered one or two tries and you need to finish those in test match rugby.‘Very high standards’“I think that this team has been so great from the start, they have got very high standards, so, although there were some hard words, they knew that they had to step up in the second half.”Assessing England’s performance, Meyer said: “I thought that England were brillant in the way that they put pressure on the nine [scrumhalf], and they pressed very hard in midfield, so we made a few changes to our tactical kicking in the second half, which worked.“I thought the first 20 minutes they pressed very hard and we should have played more tactically, but the plan was always to open up the game in the second half.“I thought England’s tactical kicking was much better than ours in the first half, they put the ball in behind us and moved us around, so we couldn’t get any quick ball or momentum, but once we changed things in the second half, it went much better.”ScrumsThe Springboks’ tight scrums, especially, were impressive as the front row of Beast Mtawarira, Bismarck du Plessis and Jannie du Plessis ruled the roost. Later, replacements Coenie Oosthuizen and Adriaan Strauss ensured the Springboks remained in the ascendancy.All three South African debutants – Marcell Coetzee, Eben Etzebeth and Juandre Kruger – delivered in their first matches in the green and gold.Importantly, the more established players showed strong leadership and contributed significantly to the South African victory, with men such as captain Jean de Villiers, Bryan Habana and Francois Steyn standing out.England competed intensely at the breakdowns in the first half and did a good job of making matters difficult for the Springboks, but once the Boks started protecting their own ball better and challenging the English ball more effectively, they were able to play more of the game on the front foot.Flyhalf Morne Steyn, very unusually for him, had an off day with the boot in windy conditions. Had he kicked to his usual high standards, the game would not have been as close as the final scoreline suggests it was.The matchEarly on, Habana launched a good counter-attack after fielding a kick. The ball was moved wide to Pietersen, but the big wing was forced into touch.A couple of minutes later, England were awarded a penalty after the Boks were blown up for playing the ball on the ground at a ruck. Owen Farrell took a shot at goal and was successful, putting the tourists into a 3-0 lead.In the 12th minute, flank Willem Alberts made a strong break from a ruck after Habana had put good pressure on fullback Mike Brown from a high-up-and-under launched by flyhalf Steyn. When Alberts went to ground, the English slowed the South African ball and referee Steve Walsh awarded a penalty against them.LevelMorne Steyn was on target with his kick at goal and the sides were level at 3-3.England hit the front once more in the 27th minute after winning a penalty at a breakdown and Farrell again hit the target.South Africa stormed back onto the attack and within three minutes were on level terms once more thanks to a Morne Steyn penalty.Just before the break, Steyn had an opportunity to put South Africa in front, but a shot of goal drifted well wide of the right hand upright.Springbok tryThe Springboks upped their intensity in the second half and it paid off after eight minutes when Morne Steyn went over for a try. It began when captain De Villiers made good ground up the left flank. The ball was then brought back to the right where Alberts broke through a tackle before finding Jannie Du Plessis on the charge.The big prop barrelled towards the tryline, but was stopped just five metres short of the whitewash. Etzebeth did well to make some ground from slow ball and then Patrick Lambie, on for Zane Kirchner, was stopped mere centimetres short of the line.Francois Hougaard was then stopped and Beast Mtawarira came within sniffing distance of the line. The ball was moved right again and Morne Steyn, with JP Pietersen outside of him, sold a dummy before going over for the five-pointer. His conversion attempt passed to the left of the posts and South Africa led 11-6.The men in green and gold had a chance to extend their lead when they won a penalty 10 metres out and right in front of the posts, but scrumhalf Hougaard inexplicably took a quick penalty instead of the almost certain three points, which left coach Meyer gesturing unhappily towards the field.Second tryOn the hour mark, Francois Steyn fielded a high-up-and-under from England scrumhalf Ben Youngs midway between the English 22-metre line and the 10-metre line. He neatly off-loaded to Habana, who hit the ball at speed.When he was tackled midway inside the English 22, Ruan Pienaar, on for Hougaard, moved the ball swiftly to the right. De Villiers received it in space, pinned his ears back, cut in slightly and bashed his way over the line for the Springboks’ second try.South Africa led 16-6 after Steyn missed the conversion, but England were soon within seven points when Farrell slotted a third penalty to make it 16-9.Two penalties by Steyn followed in the next 10 minutes, leaving South Africa 22-12 ahead with only two minutes to play.England tryWith time up, England finally crossed the Springboks’ tryline. They made ground into the South African 22 and forced a ruck before passing the ball out wide to Ben Foden, who crashed over in the corner despite a desperate tackle attempt by Francois Steyn.Farrell’s attempt to go five from five in the difficult kicking conditions was wide and the final whistle sounded with South Africa 22-17 winners.It was hard-hitting contest and unfortunately for England’s South African-born centre Brad Barritt, formerly of the Sharks, he was one of two big casualties for England on the day.SurgeryBarritt suffered a lacerated eyeball, which required surgery. He is, however, expected to be fit for the third test. Fullback Mike Brown injured a thumb and will miss the rest of the series.Zane Kirchner’s fitness is questionable after he injured a knee.The Springboks and England next meet on Saturday at Coca-Cola Park in Johannesburg. Before that, the tourists play a midweek match against the SA Barbarians South in Kimberley on Wednesday.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Personalization offer doesn’t lead to more personal data sharing [Survey]

first_imgPersonalization offer doesn’t lead to more personal data sharing [Survey]You are here: It’s widely accepted by marketers that consumers want increasingly personalized digital experiences. And while there’s considerable survey data that appears to support that general proposition, the truth is more situational and nuanced. Resisting personalization. A new survey of 1,100 U.S. adults in March, conducted by the Advertising Research Foundation (ARF) appears to fly in the face of the conventional wisdom about personalization. It found that “telling people that sharing their data will allow for a more personalized experience does not result in a greater willingness to share data.”Overall, the survey found that consumers were using their PCs less and mobile apps more for daily and routine tasks, such as email, social media, music, content discovery and e-commerce. But the findings about personalization are the most interesting and significant. In most instances, people seemed less willing to share information in exchange “for a personalized experience.” Personalization offer didn’t impact openness to data sharing Source: ARF (2019)Compared with 2018, people demonstrated somewhat more resistance to sharing personal data. According to ARF, “The biggest changes in respondents’ willingness to share their data from 2018 to 2019 were seen in their home address (-10 percentage points), spouse’s first and last name (-8 percentage points), personal email address (-7 percentage points), and first and last names (-6 percentage points).” Better understanding of terms, declining trust. As evidence that audiences are becoming more sophisticated, the survey found somewhat greater understanding of terms that might appear in a hypothetical privacy policy. Overall, respondents found marketing terms such as “first party data” or “third party data” less confusing than in 2018. This slightly improved comprehension of terminology was true across groups, with Hispanics demonstrating the “clearest understanding.” The survey also explored consumer trust in various media and institutions. Consistent with other surveys, ARF found declining levels of trust generally, though not radically so. Americans’ trust in media and institutions Source: ARF (2019)Putting aside Congress, social media and advertising are the least trusted among the various choices presented. For regular social media users, there is only a 1 point decline from 2018. However, occasional social media users’ trust was down 3 points, which is the same for general advertising. The survey found the highest trust in “people like me.” Where might people encounter others like themselves online — social media or reviews. Why should we care. Any single survey shouldn’t change our worldview. And this one asked relatively general questions about trust and personalization. Highly specific personal data scenarios could and likely would yield different answers. It’s fairly clear that a kind of privacy-personalization paradox exists. So generalizations must always be qualified. People are increasingly sensitive to privacy issues but will share information when there are clear, defined benefits. Consumers also want retailers, platforms and brands to ask permission for use of their data. And, for some people, “personalization” may now be a dirty word, implying “tracking” or “surveillance.” With the impeding implementation of CCPA and other data privacy bills making their way through state legislatures, we’re rapidly moving toward an opt-in data framework where marketers will need to ask permission to use personal data — and convincingly sell consumers on the benefits. The post Personalization offer doesn’t lead to more personal data sharing [Survey] appeared first on Marketing Land.From our sponsors: Personalization offer doesn’t lead to more personal data sharing [Survey] HomeDigital MarketingPersonalization offer doesn’t lead to more personal data sharing [Survey] Related postsLytics now integrates with Google Marketing Platform to enable customer data-informed campaigns14th December 2019The California Consumer Privacy Act goes live in a few short weeks — Are you ready?14th December 2019ML 2019121313th December 2019Global email benchmark report finds email isn’t dead – it’s essential13th December 20192019 benchmark report: brand vs. non-brand traffic in Google Shopping12th December 2019Keep your LinkedIn advertising strategy focused in 202012th December 2019 Posted on 15th August 2019Digital Marketing FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+sharelast_img read more

IPL 2014: Key Players from Chennai Super Kings

first_imgMS Dhoni will play a crucial role for Chennai in the IPL 2014 Total Money Spent(including retention): Rs 59.80 croreSquad: 20 players including 12 Indians and 8 overseas.Players to watch out for:MS Dhoni: If Chennai Super Kings intend to repeat their 2010 and 2011 heroics in the IPL 7 this year, it has to be skipper MS Dhoni who’ll need to lead from the front. The 32-year-old Captain Cool is one of the best finishers in limited overs cricket today. His ability to hold wickets in pressure situations and then accelerate ferociously at the death overs has earned him accolades all over the globe. With over 2200 runs in 96 games for Super Kings, Dhoni is as ferocious as they come in T20.Suresh Raina: One of the most prolific batsmen in the T20 format, he comes to the party more often than not. Not only is he capable of clearing the boundaries when required, his off-spin is also very handy. Raina is also one of the leading run-scorers for Super Kings with over 2800 runs and 21 wickets in his 99 IPL games.Ravichandran Ashwin: He is one of the bankers of the side and can put the brakes on opposition batsmen while also getting wickets. With 64 wickets in 67 games, Ashwin has been a key performer for the Super Kings in the IPL so far.Brendon McCullum: The 32-year-old swashbuckling batsman is the latest weapon Super Kings boasts of in the seventh edition of the IPL. The New Zealand skipper is one of the most explosive batsmen in the shortest version of the game. His breathtaking knock of 158 runs for Kolkata Knight Riders in the inaugural IPL match showcases his ability to take the game away from the opposition. With over 1200 runs in 48 games, McCullum will be one of the key players for the Super Kings this season.advertisementRavindra Jadeja: He has been on an amazing high over the past one year, with immense success in international cricket thanks to his left-arm spinners. A great fielder, he will also be expected to contribute with the bat. His bowling spell of 5/16 was registered as the best bowling figures in the IPL tournament in 2012. Jadeja has slammed over 1100 runs and notched up 39 wickets in his IPL career so far.last_img read more