Florida Governor Proposes Tax Holidays and Reduced Millage Rate

first_imgFlorida Gov. Ron DeSantis has proposed the following in his 2019-2020 budget:– a three-day back to school sales tax holiday on clothing up to $60, school supplies up to $15, and the first $1,000 on computers;– a one-week disaster preparedness sales tax holiday on items needed during disasters including generators up to $750; and– a property tax millage rate reduction of 0.157.News Release, Office of Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, February 1, 2019Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Missouri governor stands by open-records policy

first_img(AP) Missouri Gov. Mike Parson’s spokesman says his office will continue to shield certain contact information from public-record requests.Spokesman Steele Shippy on Tuesday defended the practice following complaints from Democratic Auditor Nicole Galloway.At issue is the Republican governor’s response to public record requests made by The Kansas City Star and others. Parson’s office has cited the First Amendment in redacting phone numbers, addresses and emails of private citizens who contacted the governor.The newspaper reports that Galloway requested that the state attorney general weigh in on whether Parson broke the law by making those redactions.Parson’s office has argued that it’s an issue of free speech and that constituents wouldn’t contact elected officials if they believed that information might become public.Shippy called Galloway’s criticism a “lame partisan political attempt.”last_img read more

Missouri tourism director out after whistleblower complaint

first_img(AP) – Missouri’s top tourism official is out of a job, days after a complaint accused him of excessive taxpayer-funded travel and improper acceptance of gifts from a state vendor.The Missouri Division of Tourism announced Director Ward Franz’s departure Friday but didn’t say if he was fired or resigned.An Oct. 25 letter from an investigator in Democratic state Auditor Nicole Galloway’s office outlined allegations from a whistleblower complaint. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch obtained the letter through an open-records request.The whistleblower alleged that in addition to travel expense concerns, Franz accepted baseball tickets “valued at over $1,000” for games at Yankee Stadium and Fenway Park.Franz does not have a listed phone number. He formerly served as chief of staff to Republican Gov. Mike Parson when Parson was lieutenant governor.last_img read more

Remote Configuration – RCT.EXE – HOW TO’s.

first_imgHow do you decipher RCT Codes? Great question. In the Intel AMT SCS Installation and User Maual there is a section of the document focused on the RCT. Here’s the sample uses. This is on Page 70 of the[User Manual.|http://softwarecommunity.intel.com/isn/downloads/Manageability/Intel_AMT_SCS_Installation_and_UserManual.pdf] Also here are the Codes that come back after running. Hope this helps……center_img If your receiving an Error #7 specifically. Here’s more information: ERROR #7. Unable to connect to the SCS. This may be due to a number of causes, such as TCP error, HTTP error, or server not found. This may result from:• An incorrect FQDN for the SCS in the command line.• A failed HTTPS connection due to a missing trusted root certificate.• IIS is stopped on the SCS platform.If you are interested in where this tool is located, Bill York explained in this post. last_img read more

Funny Video on Fishing & vPro

first_imgI was out 2 weeks ago @ ManageFusion in Orlando and this video was played. I realize this is more in the humor & fun category, however thought you may enjoy this one. (also note none of these folks are me in the video – you couldn’t get me to jump out of a boat in Seattle). Enjoy..last_img

Remote ISO Launcher

first_imgEver want to remotely boot an ISO image on your vPro machine but find it’s cumbersome to load up a management console? Do you day dream of launching a simple application entering your machine’s name and clicking boot? Wish that it would support Fast Call for Help, TLS and have a vt100 terminal built in? Do you wish you could embed commands into your ISO image that would communicate back to the application and generate menus or get user input?Meet the Remote ISO Launcher! I’ve written an application that does just that! You can download the binaries from here: http://communities.intel.com/docs/DOC-5943But wait! There’s more! The source code is also included at no extra cost!Try it out and leave feedback.Thanks–Richard(Legal disclaimer: By downloading the source code you agree not to mock my code. Bugs or feature enhancements welcome. Just no mocking )last_img read more

New Hardware Security Solutions Stand Firm Against Cyber Intruders

first_imgIntellectual property loss, difficult remediation programs, and reputation damage are all possible results of a cyberattack. Major data breaches are popping up everywhere, and the costs to the U.S. economy is enormous. In 2013, a federal commission estimated a loss of $300 billion each year in intellectual property alone. The same year, an independent study performed by Ponemon Institute revealed that the average organizational cost for a data breach was upwards of $5.4 million. For some companies, an attack of that magnitude could be disastrous.Security software has been the go-to defense in the enterprise, but no matter how tight your firewall or how many anti-malware services you use, there are still cybercriminals who will find new vulnerabilities or approaches to your protected data. The ideal hardware perfect partners with many current security software offerings that improves performance and productivity, accelerates cryptography, and bolsters encryption.SoftwareThe biggest problem with security software is that the technology of the services hasn’t kept pace with the kinds of security problems modern enterprises are facing. Due to increased demand for new device support and consumerization, the IT infrastructure of most companies is expanding. This is good in many ways, but it also offers a larger playing field for hackers. For example, an unsecured device paired with unsecured wireless connectivity could mean trouble, no matter what your software security plan looks like.In addition to being slow to evolve, security software is also notorious for slowing down your employees. In this new, hyperconnected business environment, employees expect performance and high levels of usability from the platforms they use to do work. Productivity lags when there are barriers to efficiency. Not only does locking down a data center and adding layers of authentication on protected files still leave you vulnerable, it can also slows down your company’s workflow.HardwareThe complex, processor-intensive functions that many current security technologies employ can often create performance lag for users. By coupling your security software strategy with new Intel processors, you can mitigate most of this lag, creating a strong security platform with no noticeable performance decrease for users. Intel’s new approach to data protection starts with embedding security features directly into processors. New Intel Xeon, Core, and Atom processors include features that accelerate the large integer arithmetic required for public key cryptography and reduce processor loads. Additionally, these new Intel processors implement sub-steps of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) that accelerates execution of the AES software application while simultaneously lowering the risk of side-channel attacks.Take a Hard LineThe benefit of implementing secure hardware into your information security strategy is clear: fewer productivity bottlenecks caused by processor-heavy security software coupled with strengthened security endpoints leads to more efficient ways to meet regulatory compliance mandates.For more information on how Intel’s security-enabled processors can protect your business, please read “Protect Your Data from Prying Eyes.” Join in the social conversation, follow @IntelITCenter, and be sure to use #ITCenter.last_img read more

10 Mobile BI Strategy Questions: Business Processes

first_imgWhen developing a mobile business intelligence (BI) strategy, you can’t ignore the role that business processes may play. In many cases, the introduction of BI content into the portfolio of mobile BI assets provides opportunities to not only eliminate the gaps in your business operations, but to improve the existing processes.Often, the impact is seen in two main ways. First, the current business processes may require you to change your mobile BI approach. Second, the mobile BI solution may highlight gaps that may require a redesign of your business processes to improve your mobile BI assets and your business operations.Business Processes Will Influence Your Mobile BI DesignExisting business processes will have a direct impact on the design of your mobile BI solution. I’m often amazed to discover that the lack of consideration given to identifying business processes stems not from a lack of insight but from wrong assumptions that are made during the requirements and design phases.It’s true that the business processes may not be impacted if the scope of your mobile BI engagement is limited to mobilizing an existing BI asset (like a report or dashboard) without making any changes to the original end-product, including all underlying logic. But in many cases, the opposite is true—the mobile BI end product may be the driver for change, including the update of the existing BI asset as a result of a mobile BI design.Mobile solutions may require different assumptions in many aspects of their design, which range from source data updates to report layout and logic. Advanced capabilities, such as a write-back option, will further complicate things because the integration systems outside the BI platform will require closer scrutiny and a much closer alignment with business processes.Moreover, constraints that surround source data will have a direct influence on the mobile BI design. For example, if you’re dependent on feeds from external data sources, you may need to consider an additional buffer to take into account possible delays or errors in the data feed. Or, perhaps you have a new application that was just built to collect manually-entered data from field operations. If this new application was introduced as part of your mobile BI solution, the process that governs this data collection system will have a direct impact on your design because of its immediate availability. This wouldn’t have been as important before as an operational tool with a limited audience without mobile BI.Mobile BI Solution May Drive Improvements in Your Business OperationsAs part of designing your strategy or developing your mobile BI solution, you may discover either gaps or areas for improvement. Don’t worry. This is a known side effect, and it’s often considered a welcome gift because it gives you a chance to kill two birds with one stone: improve your business operations and increase the value of your mobile BI solution. However, it’s critical here to ensure that your team stays focused on the end goal of delivering on time and on schedule (unless the gaps turn out to be major showstoppers).Typical examples are found in the areas of data quality and business rules. The design of a mobile BI asset—especially if it’s new—may highlight new or known data-quality issues. The visibility factor may be different with mobile. Adoption or visibility by executives often may force additional scrutiny. Moreover, adoption rates (ratio of actual users divided by total users of mobile solutions) may be higher because of the availability and convenience with mobile. As a result, mobile users may be less tolerant about the lack of quality assurance (QA) steps.Business rules offer another example due to the same visibility factor. A proposed change in a business rule or process, which previously failed to get attention due to lack of support, may now have more backers when it’s associated with a mobile BI solution. Strong executive sponsorship may influence the outcome.Bottom Line: Do Not Ignore Business ProcessesIt’s easy to make the wrong assumptions when it comes to business processes. It happens not just in mobile BI but in other technology projects. You cannot take existing processes for granted. What may have worked before may not work for mobile BI. Let your business processes complement your overall mobile BI strategy, and let your mobile BI engagement become a conduit for opportunities to improve your operational efficiencies.Not only will these opportunities improve your business operations, but they will lead to increased adoption by increasing the trust your customers/users have in your mobile BI content.What do you see as the biggest challenge when it comes to business processes in your mobile BI strategy?Stay tuned for my next blog in the Mobile BI Strategy seriesConnect with me on Twitter at @KaanTurnaliOpens in a new window and LinkedInOpens in a new window.This story originally appeared on the SAP Analytics BlogOpens in a new window.last_img read more

Social Determinants of Health

first_imgHealth isn’t just personally determined; it’s also socially determined. Socioeconomic factors directly influence an individual’s engagement in their health. Inadequate access to healthy food, poor access to transportation, or financial constraints are just a few of the factors that can come into play. Healthcare organizations understand the importance of these factors, but curating the right data with enough fidelity to derive actionable insight isn’t easy.For a better look at these matters, we talked to Steve Levin, CEO of Connance. Connance provides social determinants-as-a-service for healthcare payers and providers. Their solutions are built on a proprietary data model developed using the company’s national experiential database. The model pulls from disparate third party databases and cleanses, aggregates, and synthesizes the information into stressor measures that line up with the core social determinant measures sought by clinicians in designing care plans and workflow.Leveraging third-party solutions like this are one way healthcare organizations can unlock the power of data to improve operations and patient engagement.Before we begin talking about the importance of social determinants, can you tell me a little about Connance? How did the company get started and what solutions do you offer today?Connance was founded 12 years ago to help healthcare providers use data more effectively. By creating a shared data platform, Connance built predictive models and workflow technology that all providers could leverage in their local operations. The fragmentation of healthcare delivery and relentless cost pressures made it hard for any single company to have both data scale and diversity as well as data science expertise.Today, Connance’s data solutions are utilized in the workflow of more than 500 hospitals, thousands of other clinical sites, and on more than three million patient encounters each month. Our traditional core is revenue cycle where we enable our clients to optimize patient revenue processes, both pre- and post-service, such as in denial and underpayment processes and vendor management. Leveraging social determinants to inform clinical workflows is our latest expansion to the solution suite.Inclusion of social determinants in healthcare decision-making has been a hot topic of discussion, but it’s hard to do. Identifying data sources with a signal, cleansing the data, analyzing it, and then using the insight to change business processes are all hard challenges. Why did it make sense for your team to take on this problem?We believe that with increasing risk-based reimbursement and expanded delivery networks, providers need to understand the patient’s world outside the exam room, managing relationships over time for high value care and sustained financial health. Social determinant understanding will quickly be a key dimension not only in patient care, but also to revenue and revenue cycle success.The recent emphasis has been on the ability to collect and manage higher patient liabilities, but as hospitals take on more financial risk, actively managing the cost of care will quickly become a top priority. For patients in bundles, the deductible exposure will likely be financially less significant than proper post-discharge rehab. That post-discharge rehab might be at risk due to transportation limitations, predictable and preventable. A major portion of readmissions are tied to social determinant issues, not clinical complications.The actual application of social determinant insight is what we’ve learned to do successfully in revenue cycle. It’s about taking the predictions and using them in existing provider systems to segment long lists and targeted follow-up strategies. It’s about resource allocation for better overall value. Now, apply those concepts to patient care. If clinicians had unlimited budgets, every complicated discharge would come with a home visit the next day. The problem is that budgets don’t work that way, so we have to figure out where those home visits can make the most difference as compared to a phone call check-in.Describe, if you could, your current social determinants solution and the types of organizations that are using it today.At its core, our value-based risk analytics solution enables payers and providers to conduct patient-specific, social determinant health screening at a large scale. We’ve built models leveraging publicly available and third-party consumer data that replicate commonly used survey tools and can accurately identify an individual’s social determinant of health challenges. This allows organizations to proactively evaluate tens of thousands of individuals in a matter of minutes, as opposed to manually assessing one patient at a time, usually only during an encounter.This data is then used to segment patient populations, customize treatment plans, identify care gaps, refer patients to available community health resources, and improve patient engagement. Organizations that are using this today include hospitals and health systems that have begun taking on risk through value-based care initiatives, state Medicaid agencies, health plans, and technology partners. These organizations are embedding social determinant of health risk measures into their platforms to support population health efforts and patient communications.I’d like to talk about how your customers are integrating this back into business workflow. Changing workflow in healthcare is difficult. I’ve seen numerous well-intentioned advanced analytics initiatives stall when it comes time to move them into production. What are some best practices you’ve seen with customers that have been successful in integrating a data-driven solution like this into their business?It starts with making the data easily accessible where the end user is already working today, whether that be in an electronic medical record, case management system, population health system, or elsewhere. Early on, we made the decision not to develop a separate platform for our solution, but rather to push our data and analytics into existing clinical systems. The data sits alongside other relevant clinical and behavioral information and is immediately available to care team members as they’re conducting their work.This also allows the data to be easily embedded into the clinical workflow through technical integration in areas such as risk stratification algorithms, the ability to trigger notifications or “flags” for certain high-risk patients directly in the clinical platform, and inclusion of the social determinants of health factors in metrics and reporting, among others.In many ways we’re at the early stages of systematically using non-clinical data to help improve healthcare, in part because many of the data sources that could be of interest are still fairly new in digital form. How do you see your solution changing to meet healthcare’s evolving needs and the changing data landscape?We would agree that the industry is still in the early stages of effectively leveraging non-clinical data. The key today, as we see it, is both helping care teams embrace the role of third-party data and getting that data into usable forms at the right time. Despite all the studies and literature that show the outsized impact social determinant of health factors have on outcomes and cost, the system is still predominantly built around delivering clinical care to the sick and injured. That’s changing, and as new systems, partnerships, and reimbursement models are developing, we’re seeing a rapidly increasing demand for these types of data. Providers are seeing the issue and innovation is focused on bringing social determinant insight to earlier moments in the patient relationship.Clinicians and care resources have always known this information is critical. However, with time pressures, resource limitations, inconsistency in capturing the data, the fact that this data often comes too late in the engagement process, and the frequent reluctance by patients to share this type of information, the focus now is to marry patient engagement with external data insight. Effectively, we need to get smart from public information before patients arrive on campus. We also need to prepare for populations that lack claim or clinical profiles, and hopefully test and sharpen our picture of them with new patients from those populations.Getting good external data is a challenge in knowing where and what data is available, appreciating the limitations of that data, and designing a methodology that brings it into usable form. Our data science team is continually reviewing new data sources for their quality, coverage, appropriateness, and value. A lot of what we read about in the media in terms of digital footprints is interesting, but we’re not sure it’s completely suitable for care processes.Not all information is available at every point in the patient lifecycle or for every patient. In many situations it’s a patchwork. Similarly, putting too much detailed data in front of care resources isn’t helpful. It becomes a data deluge. So we also spend a lot of time thinking about how to synthesize lots of data points into useful measures and indicators while making the insight quickly digestible, consistent, and useable to improve resource impact.With all the discussion around healthcare being disrupted, what’s one trend that you don’t think people are talking enough about?We think there’s not enough conversation around loyalty and brand-building in the industry. It’s becoming increasingly clear that simply passing more cost to the patient isn’t solving the larger issue of cost and value. While organizations are getting bigger in order to gain scale, control costs, and manage reimbursement, it’s not changing the value equation. What seems to be missing is the patient side of this.If we were in a traditional consumer product or service business, we’d tackle the value equation by understanding the lifetime value of a patient, thinking about how we build loyalty and brand affinity so we can influence their utilization and perception of value. Large local providers need to think about building a singular relationship with their population. Patients don’t know if their relationship is with their primary care doctor (if they have one), their insurer, or their specialist. And what do we do when it’s a family with newborns or teenagers?Provider organizations need to think about the patient as a long-term partner and build trust, loyalty, and value. Workflow needs to seamlessly capitalize on what they know about a patient to direct them in a smarter way before they arrive. Connect what currently feels like stand-alone entities into a single relationship. Connect the financial problem into a single accounting. Connect the handoffs so people know they have a health partner managing in the background.Finally, can you share any details about the next 12 to 24 months at Connance? It’s an exciting time for us. We continue to see rapid growth in our revenue cycle optimization solution. More and more, people are recognizing that new EMRs and systems give them stability but not optimization. Optimization is the only way to see the true ROI in these huge investments.The value-based care landscape is still evolving, and every new deployment is demonstrating really powerful insights and innovations. We see tremendous growth in this space and are just scratching the surface of what new data in the hands of clinicians can achieve.Thank you, Steve. For anyone who’d like to learn more about Connance and your social determinants solution, what’s the best way to get in touch?You can find a lot of information about this solution on our website. You can also email Ryan Bengtson (rbengtson@connance.com) who leads this practice for Connance.last_img read more

Transatlantic Tuna Travel

first_imgIt weighs half a ton and tastes great in sushi, but can the bluefin tuna swim across the Atlantic? A new large-scale study shows that many of the enormous fish, once thought to be provincial, do indeed swim all the way from the U.S. East Coast to the Mediterranean–and back, in some cases. The results raise questions about decades-old policies of fisheries management.Bluefin tuna that spawn in the Gulf of Mexico are larger and mature later than bluefin that spawn in the Mediterranean Sea. That’s why the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), which sets fishing rules, treats the two as separate populations: Quotas for western tuna populations, which have suffered more from overfishing, are an order of magnitude times lower. But researchers have suspected for decades that the two tuna populations may be linked, because European fishermen often catch fish tagged off the U.S. coast.In the 17 August issue of Science, Barbara Block and her colleagues at Stanford University report results from the first 5 years of a long-term project to track tuna migration patterns. Beginning in 1996, they marked 377 fish off the North Carolia coast with tags that record location, depth, and water temperature every 2 minutes. (Initially, they implanted tags that fishermen return for a reward, but gradually, they switched to tags that are strapped to the fish for up to a year before they automatically detach, bob to the surface and transmit their stored data.) Data from 147 fish showed that migration across the ocean is common: About one-third of fish with the implanted tags were caught by fishermen in the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. Some fish even swam to European waters and back.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Researchers say that the study provides the strongest evidence yet that the mingling of tuna populations is common. New England Aquarium biological oceanographer Molly Lutcavage hopes the results will convince ICCAT, which has doubted the importance of transatlantic mixing, to take this process into account. “This should put the skepticism to rest,” she says.Related sitesInternational Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic TunasTuna Research and Conservation Centerlast_img read more

CDC Chief Calls It Quits

first_imgJeffrey Koplan, the director who guided the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta through the country’s first fatal bioterrorism attacks last fall, is stepping down on 31 March. Koplan unexpectedly announced his resignation in a statement yesterday.Koplan did not give a reason for his departure in his statement. However, some public health experts, speaking on the condition of anonymity, say his departure may have been triggered by tensions between Koplan and top officials at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) about the way the CDC handled the anthrax crisis. In newspaper reports, Koplan denied that he was pressured to leave. HHS secretary Tommy Thompson called his departure a “loss,” adding that “I am going to miss [Koplan’s] counsel, leadership, and dedication to public service.”The anthrax-laced letters put unprecedented pressure on CDC, and Koplan was criticized by Congress and some media for not acting aggressively enough. The main problem, says Tara O’ Toole, director of the Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies at Johns Hopkins University, is that Koplan failed to become an effective spokesperson during the crisis. “Koplan is a very knowledgeable and credible doctor and the country would have been better off if it had seen more of him,” she says. But some point out that it’s unclear whether Koplan ducked the limelight himself, or was ordered to do so by the Bush Administration.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Koplan, who took the top job in 1998, has served CDC for decades. As a member of the agency’s famed Epidemic Intelligence Service in the 1970s, he helped eradicate smallpox in Bangladesh, one of the scourge’s last holdouts. In the 1980s, he was involved in fighting the burgeoning AIDS epidemic. Researchers also credit Koplan for doggedly supporting the rebuilding of public health infrastructure in the U.S. and upgrading old facilities at the CDC.Koplan’s statementSecretary Tommy Thompson’s statementKoplan’s biographyThe Centers for Disease Control and Preventionlast_img read more

Where NIH’s Stimulus Money Went

first_imgThe results are in for National Institutes of Health’s much-discussed Challenge Grants, and the news is only slightly better than expected: The agency funded 840 projects, which puts the portion of the mind boggling 20,000-plus applications funded at around 4%. That’s abysmal compared with the usual NIH grant success rate of around 20%. But it beats the 1%–2% (200–400 grants) that NIH originally said it would fund. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The data come from a preliminary report on how NIH spent the first half of its $10.4 billion from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The tally comes to 12,788 grants funded for $4.35 billion in 2009. (Contracts add another $379 million.) Grant categories include previously reviewed proposals that just missed the cutoff for funding from NIH’s regular budget, as well as extensions of existing projects (supplements and revisions). The dollar breakdown (see chart): $1.51 billion (34.7%) to administrative supplements, $1.43 billion (32.9%) to previously reviewed applications,  $1.15 billion (26.4%) to stimulus competitions, $218 million (5%) to competing revisions, and $45 million (1%) to summer supplements.That’s pretty consistent with NIH’s plan last February to use the bulk of the money to fund already-reviewed applications and supplement existing grants. The amount of money going to each type of award varies—a summer supplement averaged $34,000, a previously reviewed grant $368,000 a year. (Most investigators will receive a similar amount in 2010, so NIH has in effect spent most of its stimulus money.)The $1.15 billion for stimulus funding competitions includes $389 million for Challenge Grants from the NIH director’s office and other institutes. The other big new program was the larger Grand Opportunity grants; NIH funded 376 of these “GO” grants to the tune of $625 million in fiscal year 2010. The data are not final and numbers are still fluctuating. A search today of NIH Reporter for Challenge Grants found they’re up to 854.Source: NIHlast_img read more

Stem Cell Paper Retracted

first_imgThree stem cell scientists have retracted a paper they published early this year in Nature. Details are sketchy, but in the retraction, released today, they say that a “re-examination” of the paper “raised serious concerns.” In a series of experiments, the group joined the blood circulation of old and young mice, a method that’s been used for decades in different kinds of studies, to test whether animals with a certain feature (youth, in this case) can impart it to others that don’t have it. The authors, led by Amy Wagers at the Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School in Boston, reported that the old mice did develop features of younger ones, in particular in the balance of different types of bone marrow cells. They traced this change to signals from certain bone-forming cells affecting blood stem cells from the young animals. A Harvard publication gives a nice summary of the work here. The retraction specifies that three of the four authors have specifically lost confidence in the paper’s findings about the role of these bone cells. They say that the first author, postdoc Shane Mayack, did not sign on to the retraction and maintains the results are still valid. The blog Retraction Watch has some more details. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Researchers Rush to Recover Whale Fossils From Highway Project

first_img In Chile’s dry, hot, desert-like Atacama Region, a group of Smithsonian researchers are digging up whales. The fossil site, near the port city of Caldera in northern Chile, was discovered in late 2010 by a construction company expanding the Pan-American Highway. In a road cut, the workers discovered complete skeletons of baleen whales, says paleobiologist Nick Pyenson, the curator of fossil marine mammals at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. The company agreed to grant the site a brief reprieve, allowing Pyenson to coordinate a short-term excavation of the fossils. Since October, Pyenson and a team of researchers have made two trips to the site’s late Miocene marine rocks, which contain a rich diversity of marine vertebrates. They are striving to learn how the site was formed and how the marine mammals died—a field known as taphonomy. Credit: Nick PyensonMore Science News Videos The team has found more than 20 complete whale skeletons, and about 80 individual specimens, as well as other types of marine mammals. Facing a deadline sometime next month, the team has been working as quickly as possible to remove the fossils. “We’re pushing the limits for what we can do with [whole] fossils,” he adds. “It’s really logistically challenging.” Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Since the site itself may soon be destroyed, the researchers are also hoping to create a record of it, so that scientists can continue to learn from it. Toward that goal, they have brought in experts from the Smithsonian’s 3D Digitization program to image entire skeletons of fossil whales in situ before removing the fossils. “What they’re doing is using sophisticated long-range and high-resolution laser scanners,” Pyenson says. The laser imaging ratio is 1:1, he adds, so that the “literally terabytes” of data they’ve recorded can eventually be used to virtually reproduce the fossils for museums and future study by paleontologists. “My vision is that, with all this data, people could virtually go back to this site that no longer exists.”center_img Courtesy of Nick Pyenson last_img read more

NIH Has No Plans to Bring Back Third Grant Submission

first_imgQuashing hopes raised by a recent news report, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced today that it will not reverse a controversial policy that gives researchers only one chance to resubmit a rejected research grant proposal. The matter concerns the agency’s old “three strikes” rule, which allowed researchers two chances to resubmit a rejected grant application. (The three versions were known as the A0, A1, and A2.) A few years ago, an advisory committee told NIH that as budgets became tighter, peer reviewers were not approving many grants on the first submission and were instead putting investigators in a holding pattern. Strong proposals usually received funding after the applicant resubmitted the grant—but this often could mean a long wait. So in early 2009, the NIH began phasing out the A2 and allowing researchers to resubmit a rejected grant just once. If their second submission (A1) is rejected, they must revise their idea and submit it as new proposal. The change sparked an uproar. More than 2300 researchers signed a petition last year arguing that with grant success rates at record lows, the limit on resubmissions was unfair to scientists who had just missed the funding cutoff. It was especially unreasonable to expect young scientists who struck out twice to come up with an entirely new idea, the petitioners argued. NIH extramural research chief Sally Rockey soon responded by saying the agency was holding firm. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) But last month, Nature’s news blog reported that the agency was thinking about bringing back the A2. According to the story: “Senior leaders … will decide in the next several weeks whether to abandon” the two strikes policy. The article drew a flurry of comments for and against the A2 on the DrugMonkey blog—those who side with NIH point out that it would not increase the overall number of grants being funded. Today on her blog, Rockey told readers that after reviewing its latest grant data, NIH has no plans to bring back the A2. She says that the policy is working as intended: A larger portion of applications are being funded as A0s and the average wait time for receiving funding for a grant application has dropped from 93 weeks to 56 weeks. Nor are new investigators at a disadvantage, at least based on how long they wait for funding, Rockey suggested—it’s only a couple weeks longer than investigators overall. The agency also looked at what would happen if all rejected A1s above a certain quality cutoff point were funded. This would merely “displace” A0s and A1s that would eventually be funded “and increase the time to award for many applications. For these reasons, we have decided to continue the policy in its current form,” Rockey wrote.last_img read more